DOB map shows 280 miles of scaffolding in the city

Officials are hoping to crack down on loitering sidewalk sheds

New York /
May.May 02, 2017 11:40 AM

The Department of Buildings is tracking the city’s ubiquitous “sidewalk sheds” as officials push to root out those that have overstayed their welcome.

A new DOB map shows that more than 7,700 sheds dot the city and span a total of 280 miles, the New York Times reported. Some of the scaffolding dates as far back as 2006. The sheds are intended to protect pedestrians from falling construction materials but have drawn many complaints from officials and residents who see the structures as eyesores.

“It becomes part of the city landscape; you dodge it every day,” Kwanele Mpanza, 34, a real estate agent who lives near 11-year-old scaffolding in Park Slope, told the Times. “As a user of the city, it makes it more difficult to get where you need to go. It’s an additional obstacle.”

The city doesn’t have a time limit on building repairs, so scaffolding can essentially stay put indefinitely (though, violations can be issued if work isn’t eventually completed). City Councilman Ben Kallos introduced legislation that would require a building owner to complete facade restoration work within three months, with a possible three month extension. This would limit scaffolding’s lifespan on the streets to six months.

Building owners who opposed the measure argue that they don’t always have sufficient money to complete repair work right away. [NYT] — Kathryn Brenzel 


Related Articles

arrow_forward_ios
These are the tallest towers underway in NYC
These are the tallest towers underway
in NYC
These are the tallest towers underway
in NYC
A new competition asks what would houses on Mars look like (Credit: Getty Images, Pixabay)
Architecture’s final frontier: Here’s what houses on Mars might look like
Architecture’s final frontier: Here’s what houses on Mars might look like
Adam Leitman Bailey, Y. David Scharf, and Miki Naftali with 215 West 84th Street (Adam Leitman Bailey, Morrison Cohen, Getty)
Naftali lays out project as holdout tenant plays new card
Naftali lays out project as holdout tenant plays new card
Seth Boyden Court in Newark NJ with Great Point Studios CEO Robert Halmi (Loopnet, Great Point Studios, iStock)
Film studio to replace vacant public housing in Newark
Film studio to replace vacant public housing in Newark
Harry and Linda Macklowe (Getty Images, Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY, Sotheby's, iStock)
Macklowe art collection fetches nearly $1B at auction
Macklowe art collection fetches nearly $1B at auction
A photo illustration of charter bus company North Fork Express (left), Tritec Real Estate's planned Ronkonkoma Hub project (middle) and Tritec Real Estate's principal Robert Coughlan (EverybodyWiki/Orenawong, Tritec Real Estate, iStock)
Holdout threatens massive Long Island development
Holdout threatens massive Long Island development
Midwood’s John Usdan and 210 Douglass Street (Midwood)
Landlord in rush for 421a booted Gowanus business: lawsuit
Landlord in rush for 421a booted Gowanus business: lawsuit
Elad Group's Isaac Tshuva and1299 Third Avenue (Getty, Google Maps)
Elad picks up shovel-ready UES development site
Elad picks up shovel-ready UES development site
arrow_forward_ios

The Deal's newsletters give you the latest scoops, fresh headlines, marketing data, and things to know within the industry.

Loading...