The Real Deal New York

Hamptons Cheat Sheet: Southampton behemoth hits the market for $145M, Michael Bloomberg politicks over golf course … & more

By Cathaleen Chen | May 10, 2017 01:50PM

The Gin Lane property and Michael Bloomberg (Credit: Getty Images)

$145M Gin Lane home hits the market as one of the priciest listings in the country

If this Southampton property sells for the asking price, it would be the second-most expensive home ever sold in the area. (An East Hampton home that went for $147 million in 2014 holds the record.) This 3.7-acre compound named La Dune contains two residences totaling 22,000 square feet. It has 12 bedrooms, 13 bathrooms, two heated pools, a guesthouse, a tennis court, nine fireplaces, a gym, a library, a billiards room, and 400 feet of beach frontage. Both structures on the property were built in 1900 by New York firm McKim, Mead and White. Harald Grant at Sotheby’s International Realty has the listing. [27E]

A private road in Water Mill gets a $2.5M price tag

What’s it like to truly “own the road”? For whoever coughs up $2.5 million to buy a 1.25-Acre Street in Water Mill, “it’s really all about the control,” says Warren Padula, whose family possessed it for more than 50 years. Holly Lane runs through several properties, all valued at millions of dollars, according to the Long Island Business Journal. Though a group of homeowners offered to buy it three years ago, Padula says the amount suggested was far below the private road’s current listing price. The new owner will have the right to build and lease a dock at the bay end of the street and they can modify the gate on the western end, should they so choose. Paul Brennan of Douglas Elliman has the listing. [LIBJ]

Michael Bloomberg flexes political muscle for his beloved Southampton golf course

Former New York City mayor wears many hats: politician, business mogul, advocate of gun control, and now, he’s also the face of the Shinnecock Hills Golf Club outreach committee.  Bloomberg reportedly called the Southampton Town Highway Superintendent Alex Gregor last week to discuss the possibility of rerouting a road that runs through the private club, 27East reported. In an effort to sway the town official, Bloomberg recalled when he was running for a third term as mayor in New York, and George Bush had reached out to him with the threat of endorsing his opponent. Bloomberg said to Gregor, “Well, perhaps I’ll endorse your opponent.” But the town official insists that the media magnate wasn’t serious. “I don’t really know the man — I think he’s entitled to kid around in his own way,” Gregor said. [27E]

132-year-old East Hampton home listed for nearly $5M

For $4.95 million, you get a little bit of history with your modern amenities. Built in 1885 for mason Frank Cartwright, the compound’s main house and two guest houses feature a total of 5,050-square-feet of living space, with eight bedrooms and 8.5 bathrooms. A garage and the original outhouse are also on the property. Many original features of the home remain, including pine floors and the wood-burning fireplace. Modern updates include stainless steel appliances and Calcutta Gold Marble countertops. William Kuneth and Leslie Hillel of Halstead have the listing. [Curbed]

East Hampton Town to evict preschool and summer camp at Wainscott airport property

No more kumbaya. The East Hampton Town Board is evicting the Country School preschool and summer day camp at the Waiscott airport property after the school failed to negotiate a new lease with the town, 27East reported. The facility has operated there 18 years. The founder of the school, Deena Zenger, told the paper that her original lease from the late 1990s was never renewed, and that even though the initial terms would have allowed her to buy the property, the town ruled last week that she cannot do so. She will be challenging the eviction in court, she said. The school pays $3,000 per year under the lease agreement. That’s far less than what newer tenants are paying. When Hertz car rental company renewed last year, its rent leapt from $7,000 per year to more than $100,000. [27E]