Eataly chef, Brodsky heiress shell out $10M for Chelsea pad

Brodsky’s father developed 177 Ninth Avenue in 2008

TRD New York /
Jul.July 07, 2017 05:30 PM

Simone Falco (Credit:Rossopomodoro) and 177 Ninth Avenue

Eataly chef Simone Falco and his wife Katherine Brodsky Falco, the daughter of real estate developer Daniel Brodsky, bought a four-bedroom pad at 177 Ninth Avenue in Chelsea for $9.9 million, according to property records filed with the city Friday.

Daniel Brodsky’s Brodsky Organization TRData LogoTINY developed the seven-story, 54-apartment building in 2008.

Falco, a Naples native and former Rugby player, is the owner of Rossopomodoro, a restaurant in the Flatiron District food hall Eataly. Brodsky Falco is the executive director of Crime Lab New York, a research organization dedicated to reducing crime, according to her LinkedIn profile.

The fourth-floor apartment features 28 floor-to-ceiling windows and four and a half bathrooms, according to StreetEasy. The building, dubbed Chelsea Enclave, sits next door to The General Theological Seminary On West 21st Street and overlooks a courtyard garden.


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