Fruchthandler son hit with restraining order in marital spat

Judge rules Ephraim used mattress to shove wife out of bedroom

TRD New York /
Aug.August 03, 2017 02:05 PM

Abraham Fruchthandler’s son was hit with a restraining order following an alleged domestic dispute at his Midwood mansion last year.

Ephraim Fruchthandler, 52, kicked his wife of 30 years, Leah Fruchthandler, out of their “luxurious, newly renovated 11-bedroom marital residence” following an argument last Passover, a judge in Brooklyn Family Court ruled, according to the New York Post.

When she returned to the home in August 2016, the two got into another fight, and an outdoor surveillance camera caught Leah “gesticulating and speaking emphatically in [her] husband’s face” before Ephraim “lunges toward [his] wife and appears to yell in her face, frightening her enough to make her take a few steps backwards,” the court ruling found.

They got into another argument a few days later, which ended with Ephraim throwing a queen-size mattress against his wife, and then used it to shove her out of the bedroom, the judge wrote.

Leah has also filed for divorce, claiming she found “sexually explicit chatting and encounter” apps on his phone including Just Hook Up and Zoosk.

Ephraim’s attorney told the Post that his client denies acting in a violent manner toward his wife and said they plan to appeal the restraining order. Leah’s lawyer did not return the newspaper’s request for comment.

The Fruchthandler family oversees 25 million square feet of commercial space and 4,000 residential units. It’s an investor in the Woolworth Building and Industry City.

The family recently partnered with former Extell Development acquisitions head Dov Hertz to buy an eight-building portfolio from EJ Realty for $141.5 million and split up the properties. The Fruchthandlers and Hertz’s DH Property  held on three buildings in Brooklyn at 130 East 18th Street, 625 Marlborough Road and 105-131 East 86th Street[NYP]Rich Bockmann


Related Articles

arrow_forward_ios
(Photos by Sylvia Varnham O'Regan, Getty)

After looting, BIDs reverse guidance on boarding up stores

After looting, BIDs reverse guidance on boarding up stores
“5 years ago, people would say, what’s a TikTok?” Bill Rudin on why NYC’s office market may be more resilient than you think

“5 years ago, people would say, what’s a TikTok?” Bill Rudin on why NYC’s office market may be more resilient than you think

“5 years ago, people would say, what’s a TikTok?” Bill Rudin on why NYC’s office market may be more resilient than you think
Clockwise from bottom left: Robert Reffkin of Compass, John Gomes, Scott Rechler of RXR Realty, Rich Barton of Zillow, Gary Keller of Keller Williams and Don Peebles of The Peebles Corporation (Getty)

“America is in crisis:” Real estate leaders address George Floyd protests

“America is in crisis:” Real estate leaders address George Floyd protests
A mass timber project in Cleveland is now under construction and could be the nation’s tallest when completed. Harbor Bay Real Estate Advisors’ Intro development will rise nine stories with 298 residential units (Credit: Harbor Bay Real Estate Advisors)

Mass timber project in Cleveland could be nation’s tallest

Mass timber project in Cleveland could be nation’s tallest
Joy Construction’s Eli Weiss (left), Maddd Equities’ Jorge Madruga (top), and Drew Katz with 20 Bruckner Boulevard in the Bronx (Getty; Google Maps)

“Dream” comes true for long-vacant Bronx ice house

“Dream” comes true for long-vacant Bronx ice house
“We’re not in the business of land-grabbing:” Hana CEO on the future of flex space

“We’re not in the business of land-grabbing:” Hana CEO on the future of flex space

“We’re not in the business of land-grabbing:” Hana CEO on the future of flex space
Photo illustration of Sen. Brian Kavanagh (Credit: Kavanagh by Albin Lohr-Jones/Pacific Press/LightRocket, Getty Images, iStock)

Lawmakers skip #CancelRent in favor of more modest bills

Lawmakers skip #CancelRent in favor of more modest bills
The process for challenging property assessments is so antiquated, officials won’t do Zoom meetings. (iStock)

“A recipe for disaster”: Fighting property taxes in a pandemic

“A recipe for disaster”: Fighting property taxes in a pandemic
arrow_forward_ios

The Deal's newsletters give you the latest scoops, fresh headlines, marketing data, and things to know within the industry.

Loading...