Office builders are thinking about Mars when they design new projects

High CO2 levels can drain worker performance

TRD New York /
Oct.October 09, 2017 01:15 PM
 

A happy and healthy workplace is a productive workplace, according to engineers, architects and scientists who are using academic research to build better office spaces.

Planners are using what’s called “evidence-based design” to help mitigate environmental factors that lead to a loss in productivity, but the research is still preliminary, the Wall Street Journal reported.

Combining sensors with workers’ self-reported levels of productivity and satisfaction — not dissimilar to what how scientists are studying the possibility of life on Mars — can produce data that helps to qualify the effects of new designs, according to the newspaper.

“We can now with sensors just see what works well and what works badly, said Arjun Kaicker, the head of user parametrics at Zaha Hadid Architects in London.

One of the worst offenders is the level of CO2 in an office. A study from researchers at Harvard University, Syracuse University and SUNY Upstate Medical University in 2015 found that high carbon dioxide levels in offices can decrease cognitive performance in knowledge workers by 15 percent.

Levels are often highest in meeting rooms, where they can reach 3,000 parts per million. That’s about 7.5 times the current level of CO2 found in Earth’s atmosphere.

Developers like Delos, which implemented its own “Well” standard at its healthy Greenwich Village Building, are are trying to codify design standards to make the workplace healthier. But experts said it can be difficult to correlate tweaks and changes to actual productivity levels. [WSJ]Rich Bockmann


Related Articles

arrow_forward_ios
The Observation Deck at Hudson Yards (Credit: Adam Pogoff)

Views from 1,100 feet: A tour of Related’s “the edge,” the tallest outdoor observation deck in the Western Hemisphere

Views from 1,100 feet: A tour of Related’s “the edge,” the tallest outdoor observation deck in the Western Hemisphere
These are the tallest towers underway in NYC

These are the tallest towers underway
in NYC

These are the tallest towers underway
in NYC
A new competition asks what would houses on Mars look like (Credit: Getty Images, Pixabay)

Architecture’s final frontier: Here’s what houses on Mars might look like

Architecture’s final frontier: Here’s what houses on Mars might look like
Columbia Property Trust CEO Nelson Mills and 245-249 West 17th Street (Photos via Columbia Property Trust; StreetEasy)

Columbia Property Trust collects 98% of its rent in Q3

Columbia Property Trust collects 98% of its rent in Q3
Knotel CEO Amol Sarva (iStock)

Knotel slashes its workforce again

Knotel slashes its workforce again
Bob Sulentic (Getty, iStock)

CBRE income falls nearly 10%

CBRE income falls nearly 10%
From left: Paramount CEO Albert Behler, 1301 6th Avenue, 712 5th Avenue, 31 West 52nd Street (Getty; Google Maps)

Paramount Group back at work, but tenants waiting until 2021

Paramount Group back at work, but tenants waiting until 2021
Tony Malkin (Getty, iStock)

Empire State Realty Trust reports second consecutive quarterly loss

Empire State Realty Trust reports second consecutive quarterly loss
arrow_forward_ios

The Deal's newsletters give you the latest scoops, fresh headlines, marketing data, and things to know within the industry.

Loading...