Trade groups unhappy with fine hikes for building code violations

One bill seeks to impose new fine for deaths and injuries

New York /
Oct.October 20, 2017 11:30 AM
 
 

A trio of City Council bills hike up penalties for building code violations and creates a new fine for when a death occurs at a construction site.

The council approved two bills this week, one that will raise the minimum civil penalty for “major violations” from $1,000 to $2,000, the Commercial Observer reported. The other measure establishes a “violation ratio,” which is the number of — in Department of Building lingo — major and/or immediately hazardous violations in the last six months on a site divided by its square footage. If a site goes over that ratio, the DOB can double fines for each violation.

Another bill, which has not yet been voted on, would impose fines ranging from $500,000 to $1.5 million when a construction worker is seriously injured or dies on a site. Trades groups are not happy about the measures. Louis Coletti, president and CEO of the Building Trades Employers’ Association, called the fines “arbitrary and capricious.”

“These are just so blatantly a cash grab to bring in money,” said Diane Cahill, a lobbyist for the Associated Builders and Contractors, an open-shop group.

Cahill said the legislation is an attempt to pay for the training now required under a construction safety bill that passed last month. [CO] — Kathryn Brenzel 


Related Articles

arrow_forward_ios
(Getty / Photo Illustration by Alison Bushor for The Real Deal)
Five reasons Andrew Cuomo is doomed
Five reasons Andrew Cuomo is doomed
The person behind the prank website is still anonymous. (Getty)
Phony website falsely claims REBNY cancels rent
Phony website falsely claims REBNY cancels rent
(iStock/Illustration by Kevin Rebong for The Real Deal)
These are real estate executives’ worst worries for 2021
These are real estate executives’ worst worries for 2021
(iStock/Illustration by Kevin Rebong for The Real Deal)
To boost economy, NYC will invest in rapid Covid test
To boost economy, NYC will invest in rapid Covid test
U.S. District Judge John Campbell Barker, who was appointed by former President Donald Trump, ruled the eviction moratorium to be unconstitutional. (Getty, Texas Attorney General)
National eviction moratorium ruled unconstitutional, but remains in place
National eviction moratorium ruled unconstitutional, but remains in place
Meredith Marshall (Photo by Emily Assiran)
“We need more housing”: Q&A with BRP Companies’ Meredith Marshall
“We need more housing”: Q&A with BRP Companies’ Meredith Marshall
(iStock/Photo Illustration by Kevin Rebong for The Real Deal)
Dubious gentrification study will backfire on New York City
Dubious gentrification study will backfire on New York City
Ryan Serhant and Gary Barnett on Development Slowdown in Pandemic
Coffee Talk: Extell’s Gary Barnett and Ryan Serhant
Coffee Talk: Extell’s Gary Barnett and Ryan Serhant
arrow_forward_ios

The Deal's newsletters give you the latest scoops, fresh headlines, marketing data, and things to know within the industry.

Loading...