The government flooded one of Houston’s wealthiest neighborhoods in Harvey. Now come the lawsuits

A 9,500 community was flooded for more than a week by the Army Corps of Engineers

New York Weekend Edition /
Nov.November 18, 2017 03:41 PM

Members of the South Carolina’s Helicopter Aquatic Rescue Team perform rescue operations in Port Arthur, Texas, August 31, 2017. (Credit: U.S. Air National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Daniel J. Martinez)

Not all flooding in Houston was caused by Hurricane Harvey. During the storm, the Army Corps of Engineers made the decision to release water from the filling dams to prevent failure, and, so, for more than a week the Corps released water into Energy Corridor, a wealth community of about 9,500 people, and its surrounding bayous, according to Bloomberg.

Now, residents whose homes — many of which have never previously flooded and would have likely withstood Harvey without significant water damage — have been condemned are suing the Corps for compensation. One resident, Kyle Haines, is also planning to sue for the wrongful death of his husband, Robert, who drowned in their home as the releases were occurring.

“I’m 100 percent certain Robert died because of the dam releases,” he told Bloomberg. “It was because of their irresponsibility that they didn’t force people to get out before they released the water.”

Attorney Tony Buzbee, who is representing many of the residents of in the community, says the evidence for his clients’ cases is strong.

“We know when the decisions were made, we know who made them, and we know that when they made them they knew which subdivisions would flood,” he told Bloomberg.

If Buzbee’s clients, and others who are pursuing legal action, are successful in suing the government, the case has the potential to change governments’ approach to handling extreme weather; it’s possible, for example, that some governments may choose to save their money for lawsuit payouts rather than constructing infrastructure that could mitigate a disaster.

[Bloomberg] — E.K. Hudson


Related Articles

arrow_forward_ios
Kirk Goodrich, president of Monadnock Development, is opposed to the bill sponsored by Bran Lander. (Getty, Monadnock Development)

Council bill favoring nonprofits for affordable housing will hurt minority-led firms: developers

Council bill favoring nonprofits for affordable housing will hurt minority-led firms: developers
Sen. Charles Schumers aid President-elect Joe Biden agreed to assist NYC. (Getty)

NYC loses $2.5B in property taxes, gets $1B from FEMA

NYC loses $2.5B in property taxes, gets $1B from FEMA
President-elect Joe Biden's relief plan focuses on the coronavirus and opening schools. (Getty)

Biden’s $1.9T package would extend eviction ban, boost rent relief

Biden’s $1.9T package would extend eviction ban, boost rent relief
Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced that a major development surrounding Penn Station. (Getty)

Cuomo adds housing to $51B Midtown West project

Cuomo adds housing to $51B Midtown West project
Knock CFO Michelle DeBella and CEO Sean Black (Photos via Knock; PR Newswire)

Knock hires ex-Lyft, Uber exec as first CFO

Knock hires ex-Lyft, Uber exec as first CFO
Eric Trump and Donald Trump Jr. with President Donald Trump (Getty)

These are the companies dumping the Trump Organization

These are the companies dumping the Trump Organization
Ray McGuire photographed by Axel Dupeux.

The Closing: Ray McGuire

The Closing: Ray McGuire
Sen. Jabari Brisport (Photo via Jabari for State Senate; iStock)

Socialist notches key NY Senate appointment

Socialist notches key NY Senate appointment
arrow_forward_ios

The Deal's newsletters give you the latest scoops, fresh headlines, marketing data, and things to know within the industry.

Loading...