Could tiny homes solve the housing crisis?

Companies see them as a way to quickly increase housing supply with less labor

New York /
Nov.November 26, 2017 10:00 AM

A Kasita tiny home (Credit: Kasita)

With construction and land costs increasing in cities across the country, some companies are turning to tiny houses to help combat these issues.

There were 10,000 tiny homes in the U.S. as of 2016, but this number is likely to increase moving forward as more companies start embracing the concept, according to Bisnow.

Amazon recently got into the game, and the tiny house firm Kasita has received approval to start building in Nevada and California. The company also plans to start offering its homes as stackable modular units, which it could start to build in February.

The stackable units will cost about $99,000 and span 400 square feet, and Kasita CEO Martyn Hoffmann told Bisnow they can be delivered to developers in about half the time of a standard build-out.

“It’s really a way to alleviate the housing crisis not through affordable housing, but to increase the housing stock,” Hoffmann said.

In New York, Mayor Bill de Blasio said he plans to set up a contest for developers to build tiny homes on small city-owned lots. [Bisnow]Eddie Small


Related Articles

arrow_forward_ios
The average price of a London home rose above 500,000 pounds, or roughly $685,000, for the first time. (Getty)
London home prices hit new high
London home prices hit new high
(Illustration by The Real Deal)
Americans bought 5.6M homes last year — the most since the bubble
Americans bought 5.6M homes last year — the most since the bubble
Randy Mastro and 21 East 83rd Street (Photos via Getty; Google Maps)
Former deputy mayor Randy Mastro, lawyer in Lucerne controversy, lists UES home
Former deputy mayor Randy Mastro, lawyer in Lucerne controversy, lists UES home
Overall, the number of housing units that started construction last year was up 7 percent from 2019. (iStock)
Residential construction had busiest year since 2006: MBA
Residential construction had busiest year since 2006: MBA
Common Projects sneaker designer Peter Poopat bought the home in December. (Getty, Brown Harris Stevens)
$6.5M Fort Greene townhouse sale breaks neighborhood record
$6.5M Fort Greene townhouse sale breaks neighborhood record
(iStock)
Homebuilder sentiment falls for second month in a row
Homebuilder sentiment falls for second month in a row
(iStock)
Homebuying up again, but rising mortgage rates depress refinancing
Homebuying up again, but rising mortgage rates depress refinancing
The two most expensive contracts signed last week were condos at One Prospect Park West. (Douglas Elliman)
Brooklyn luxury market roars back to life
Brooklyn luxury market roars back to life
arrow_forward_ios

The Deal's newsletters give you the latest scoops, fresh headlines, marketing data, and things to know within the industry.

Loading...