New Council bill hopes to bring transparency to the housing lottery

HPD would have to release report on applicants

New York /
Dec.December 01, 2017 12:22 PM

535 Carlton Avenue in Brooklyn and 855 Sixth Avenue

A new bill seeks to make the lottery for affordable housing units in the city more transparent.

Council member Mark Treyger on Thursday introduced the legislation, which would require the city to release information on how many applications they receive, how many were selected, how many were wait-listed and how many were rejected. The report, which would be released by the Department of Housing Preservation and Development, would also include certain demographic information on the applicants. The information would be organized according to income levels of those candidates — if they make 30 percent of the area median income, between 50 and 80 percent, or between 80 and 165 percent.

“We’ll finally know exactly who qualifies for affordable housing and, perhaps more importantly, who doesn’t and why,” Treyger said during a council meeting on Thursday.

The bill could shed some light on demand for apartments in certain income bands. Some developers have expressed difficulty in finding tenants for units set aside for those in the higher AMI ranges (130 to 165 percent). Tenants at this income level often unaware that they are eligible for subsidized housing, or are deterred by the amount of paperwork that goes into snagging such units.

Late last month, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced that he was expanding his affordable housing program by adding another 100,000 units to his goal. The administration aims to preserve or create 300,000 units by 2026.


Related Articles

arrow_forward_ios
All Falls Down: Kanye West’s “Star Wars”-themed affordable housing plan hits snag
All Falls Down: Kanye West’s “Star Wars”-themed affordable housing plan hits snag
All Falls Down: Kanye West’s “Star Wars”-themed affordable housing plan hits snag
(Photo Illustration by The Real Deal with Getty Images)
Cooling Sun Belt markets lead canceled home contracts
Cooling Sun Belt markets lead canceled home contracts
(Illustration by The Real Deal with Getty)
How illegal Airbnbs fall through the cracks
How illegal Airbnbs fall through the cracks
State senator Michael Gianaris with 21-12 30th Road (NY Senate, Marner Architecture, Getty)
Astoria redevelopment gets intergalactic
Astoria redevelopment gets intergalactic
53 Sonrise Place in Fellsmere, FL and Starwood Capital Group chairman Barry Sternlicht (Google Maps, Illustration by The Real Deal with Getty)
Starwood snaps up Florida affordable housing portfolio
Starwood snaps up Florida affordable housing portfolio
From left: Boston Mayor Michelle Wu and South Boston Senator Nick Collins with Boston City Hall
Controversial transfer tax bill advances in Boston
Controversial transfer tax bill advances in Boston
City Planning chair Dan Garodnick, City Council member Julie Won, City Council member Marjorie Velázquez, City Council speaker Adrienne Adams (Illustration by Kevin Cifuentes for The Real Deal with Getty Images, NYC.gov, council.nyc.gov, Twitter)
The rezoning conundrum
The rezoning conundrum
Disappearing starter homes
New York City’s incredible shrinking starter home market
New York City’s incredible shrinking starter home market
arrow_forward_ios

The Deal's newsletters give you the latest scoops, fresh headlines, marketing data, and things to know within the industry.

Loading...