Here’s something to chew on: Check out the Wrigley empire’s mansion collection

The family's true legacy is a vast portfolio of U.S. real estate

New York Weekend Edition /
Dec.December 17, 2017 10:00 AM

(Pixabay)

From mansions and ranches to custom vacation homes built throughout the U.S., the true legacy of chewing gum tycoon William Wrigley Jr. is, apparently, his real estate portfolio. The vast collection of properties continues to benefit his descendants decades after his death in 1932.

When he died, Wrigley’s estate was worth about $40 million at the time — the equivalent of about $700 million today. With much of his investment tied up in real estate, it should come as no surprise that, as the Wall Street Journal reports, his grand children and great grand children have a wide and varied portfolio themselves.

From a California ranch and winery to a historic Chicago mansion, the Wrigley’s fortune continues to be measurable based on their addresses — especially since the family sold their company in 2008 to Mars Inc. for $23 billion.

Two of the Wrigley family’s mansions are currently up for sale, asking for a respective $4.9 and $7.5 million, according to the Journal.

[WSJ] — Erin Hudson


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