Large buildings may soon get report cards for energy efficiency

Another measure seeks to limit construction noise

New York /
Dec.December 19, 2017 09:10 AM

The Planeteers in Midtown, Manhattan

Just like restaurants post letter grades in their windows, large buildings may soon have to broadcast their energy efficiency ratings.

The City Council is considering a measure that will require residential and commercial buildings larger than 50,000 square feet to post a federal energy efficiency rating and a simplified A-D letter grade in their lobbies starting in 2020, the Wall Street Journal reported. The requirement would eventually be extended to buildings that are larger than 25,000 square feet.

“We think that a market-driven approach here will help encourage more efficient buildings,” said Council member Dan Garodnick. “We think it will foster a higher level of engagement.”

The legislation is part of a package of quality-of-life measures, including one that seeks to limit the duration of noisy after-hours construction. If approved, the measure would limit permitted noise around residential buildings to 75 decibels — or about what is heard inside a city bus. The Real Estate Board of New York has said the noise is set too low and has called the energy efficiency report cards “too simplistic.” [WSJ]Kathryn Brenzel


Related Articles

arrow_forward_ios
(Getty Images)
LA developer doubled as abusive porn director, documentary alleges
LA developer doubled as abusive porn director, documentary alleges
(Getty Images)
Millions of housing units are needed in the US
Millions of housing units are needed in the US
From left: Silverstein Properties CEO Marty Burger; BedRock Real Estate Partners co-founder Tracey Applebaum; Council member Julie Won; a rendering of Innovation QNS in Astoria (Getty, BedRock Real Estate Partners, New York City Council)
Council approves Silverstein, BedRock’s $2B Innovation QNS
Council approves Silverstein, BedRock’s $2B Innovation QNS
CHIP's Jay Martin and HCR Commissioner RuthAnne Visnauskas (Getty)
Lies, damn lies, and statistics: Did rent-stabilized vacancies really fall?
Lies, damn lies, and statistics: Did rent-stabilized vacancies really fall?
MSquared's Alicia Glen, Mack Real Estate Group's Richard Mack and Association for Neighborhood and Housing Development's Barika Williams (Getty, ANHD)
Richard Mack: New York developers “made to feel like the devil”
Richard Mack: New York developers “made to feel like the devil”
From left: BedRock’s Chuck Berman and Tracey Appelbaum, Kaufman Astoria Studios' Hal Rosenbluth, and Larry Silverstein with Innovation QNS
Silverstein, Council strike deal on Queens megaproject
Silverstein, Council strike deal on Queens megaproject
Quara Holding CEO Ziad El Chaar and Donald Trump  (Getty, LinkedIn)
Trump Organization signs licensing deal with Saudi developer
Trump Organization signs licensing deal with Saudi developer
Bass extends lead over Caruso in LA mayoral race
Bass extends lead over Caruso in LA mayoral race
Bass extends lead over Caruso in LA mayoral race
arrow_forward_ios

The Deal's newsletters give you the latest scoops, fresh headlines, marketing data, and things to know within the industry.

Loading...