Large buildings may soon get report cards for energy efficiency

Another measure seeks to limit construction noise

New York /
Dec.December 19, 2017 09:10 AM

The Planeteers in Midtown, Manhattan

Just like restaurants post letter grades in their windows, large buildings may soon have to broadcast their energy efficiency ratings.

The City Council is considering a measure that will require residential and commercial buildings larger than 50,000 square feet to post a federal energy efficiency rating and a simplified A-D letter grade in their lobbies starting in 2020, the Wall Street Journal reported. The requirement would eventually be extended to buildings that are larger than 25,000 square feet.

“We think that a market-driven approach here will help encourage more efficient buildings,” said Council member Dan Garodnick. “We think it will foster a higher level of engagement.”

The legislation is part of a package of quality-of-life measures, including one that seeks to limit the duration of noisy after-hours construction. If approved, the measure would limit permitted noise around residential buildings to 75 decibels — or about what is heard inside a city bus. The Real Estate Board of New York has said the noise is set too low and has called the energy efficiency report cards “too simplistic.” [WSJ]Kathryn Brenzel


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