If you see this dog, prepare for home prices to skyrocket

The little-known link between dogs and New York real estate

New York Weekend Edition /
Feb.February 10, 2018 11:00 AM

New York. (Credit from back: Pexels, Pixabay)

Here’s a little tip from a source with their nose to the ground: if you see poodles sniffing around your neighborhood, you can bet on prices going up.

The New York Times ran the numbers and found it to be true: particular breeds of New York’s 500,000 dogs can faithfully be trusted to forecast the city’s hot markets. At the top of the list in terms of the most influential pups: poodles, the long-time top-dogs of the Upper East Side who’ve lately been seen prowling parks in south west Manhattan.

“It’s almost as if the idea of the Upper East Side has relocated,” Compass agent Jason Saft told the Times, about the influx of poodles in the West Village.

Between 2012 and 2016, the number of poodles registered in Hell’s Kitchen and Chelsea exploded and with them came developers. The West Village area’s median sales price is now $1.3 million surpassing the UES in 2013, according to the Times.

A good rule of the thumb: the tinier the dog and the rarer the breed, the pricier homes will get. [NYT]Erin Hudson


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