Four favorites to win Amazon’s HQ2

The tech giant has narrowed the competition for where to build its second headquarters down to 20 cities

New York Weekend Edition /
Feb.February 11, 2018 05:54 PM

(Credit: Pexels)

While there are officially 20 cities Amazon is deciding between, economists have singled out four stand-out contenders.

The four cities, all located in Southern states, are being called favorites by the Wall Street Journal due to their labor-markets and employment growth. Known as Sunbelt cities, they have the right mix of capable, highly-educated workers minus fierce competition from whom Amazon might have to fight to hire them away.

“There are some places like Boston that have a lot of well educated workers, but if you look at the unemployment rate…it would have a difficult time accommodating 50,000 new workers,” said Oxford Economics’ Matthew Mowell. Here are cities the that seem like the front-runners in the quest to bring Amazon to town:

Austin

(Credit: Ed Schipul)

Raleigh

(Credit: Wikimedia Commons)

Nashville

(Credit: dconvertini/Wikimedia Commons)

Dallas

(Credit: Pixabay)

[WSJ]Erin Hudson


Related Articles

arrow_forward_ios
Steve Roth and renderings of 260 11th Avenue (Getty, Profile New York)
Vornado lays out vision for Otis Elevator Building complex
Vornado lays out vision for Otis Elevator Building complex
From left: Arch Companies' Jeff Simpson and Hello Living's Eli Karp along with a rendering of 1580 Nostrand Avenue (Getty Images, Arch Companies, Hello Living)
Eli Karp’s Hello Living says goodbye to Flatbush project
Eli Karp’s Hello Living says goodbye to Flatbush project
A photo illustration of Daniel Brodsky and 75 West End Avenue (Getty Images, Google Maps)
Brodsky brings challenge to NYC Airbnb law
Brodsky brings challenge to NYC Airbnb law
(Illustration by The Real Deal with Getty)
How illegal Airbnbs slip through the cracks
How illegal Airbnbs slip through the cracks
FSA Capital’s Benjamin Clyburn and 133-09 37th Avenue in Flushing (Google Maps, Breaking Ground, Getty)
Brian Pun’s FSA Capital plans 173K sf project in Flushing
Brian Pun’s FSA Capital plans 173K sf project in Flushing
Brookfield Properties’ Brian Kingston with Two Manhattan West (Brookfield Properties, Getty)
Hedge fund finds 283K sf at Two Manhattan West
Hedge fund finds 283K sf at Two Manhattan West
Savills' Nick Farmakis with 655 and 767 Third Avenue (Loopnet, Getty, Savills)
Third Avenue: The land of “leave-behind”
Third Avenue: The land of “leave-behind”
(Getty)
Zoning, infrastructure limits are squeezing US land supply
Zoning, infrastructure limits are squeezing US land supply
arrow_forward_ios

The Deal's newsletters give you the latest scoops, fresh headlines, marketing data, and things to know within the industry.

Loading...