Four favorites to win Amazon’s HQ2

The tech giant has narrowed the competition for where to build its second headquarters down to 20 cities

TRD WEEKEND EDITION /
Feb.February 11, 2018 05:54 PM

(Credit: Pexels)

While there are officially 20 cities Amazon is deciding between, economists have singled out four stand-out contenders.

The four cities, all located in Southern states, are being called favorites by the Wall Street Journal due to their labor-markets and employment growth. Known as Sunbelt cities, they have the right mix of capable, highly-educated workers minus fierce competition from whom Amazon might have to fight to hire them away.

“There are some places like Boston that have a lot of well educated workers, but if you look at the unemployment rate…it would have a difficult time accommodating 50,000 new workers,” said Oxford Economics’ Matthew Mowell. Here are cities the that seem like the front-runners in the quest to bring Amazon to town:

Austin

(Credit: Ed Schipul)

Raleigh

(Credit: Wikimedia Commons)

Nashville

(Credit: dconvertini/Wikimedia Commons)

Dallas

(Credit: Pixabay)

[WSJ]Erin Hudson


Related Articles

arrow_forward_ios
Sharif El-Gamal (Photo by Desiree Navarro/WireImage)

WATCH: Developer Sharif El-Gamal has Covid-19. But he’s one of the lucky ones

Knotel CEO Amol Sarva 

Another huge round of layoffs for Knotel

Miki Naftali, Steven Witkoff and Ryan Freedman

TRD Talks: How developers are contending with coronavirus

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos in front of Fairway Market in Brooklyn (Credit: MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images; Jules Antonio via Flickr)

Amazon seeking to purchase 4 Fairway locations after grocery’s bankruptcy filing

Governor Andrew Cuomo (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images; iStock)

Cuomo’s foreclosure, mortgage moratorium has no teeth

Douglas Elliman's Howard Lorber and Amazon's Jeff Bezos (Credit: Getty Images)

Second-home tax would be “multiples worse” than Amazon loss: Howard Lorber

From left: Realogy's Ryan Schneider, Cushman & Wakefield's Brett White and Newmark Knight Frank's Barry Gosin (Credit: iStock)

Brokerage stocks plunge amid market turmoil

Mayor Bill de Blasio halted ULURP, stalling projects like 960 Franklin Avenue, Rikers Island and Industry City 

These projects could be held up by New York’s rezoning freeze

arrow_forward_ios
Loading...