City seeks to change parking rules to encourage commercial development

Regulations date back to 1961

New York /
Mar.March 16, 2018 03:57 PM

25 Kent and Marisa Lago

The Department of City Planning is looking to change parking and other zoning rules to encourage commercial development in the outer boroughs.

In certain areas in the outer boroughs, developers are required to set aside large swaths of space for parking. Though the de Blasio administration relaxed some parking mandates for subsidized housing in transit areas in 2016, requirements put in place in 1961 largely remain intact elsewhere. City Planning director Marisa Lago said she’s beginning to assess changing those outdated rules, Crain’s reported.

“The way we work has not only changed dramatically, it continues to evolve rapidly,” Lago said. “Our zoning shouldn’t stand in the way.”

The city has already approved exceptions to parking regulations on single projects. Rubenstein Partners and Heritage Equity Partners’ office complex at 25 Kent Avenue in Williamsburg would’ve required thousands of parking spots. The developers, however, got the go-ahead to avoid those rules through zoning changes[Crain’s]Kathryn Brenzel


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