Judge puts temporary restraining order on Rabsky’s Broadway Triangle site

Both sides of court battle are calling the decision a victory

New York /
Mar.March 20, 2018 12:20 PM

Rendering of the proposed development at in Broadway Triangle (Credit: Magnusson Architecture and Planning)

A judge has issued a temporary restraining order on Williamsburg’s controversial Broadway Triangle site in a move that both sides of the struggle said was a win.

Groups opposing the development claimed victory because they said the order shows the builder can’t move forward with his project, while the developer — Rabsky Group — claimed victory because the order does not prevent them from doing pre-construction work, according to Politico.

The Broadway Triangle development, located at Pfizer’s pharmaceutical facilities, would consist of eight buildings and 1,146 units, and it has been a contentious project for years. Groups such as the Broadway Triangle Community Coalition and Churches United for Fair Housing have contended that the development will mainly just benefit the Hasidic community to the detriment of other minorities.

Although the city reached an agreement with housing groups in December, Churches United recently filed a new federal complaint against the developers and the city, arguing that Rabsky has a history of either building luxury homes or apartments exclusively for Hasidic families.

In May, both sides will return to court to present their cases about the main argument of the lawsuit, which hinges on whether construction of the Broadway Triangle project requires an assessment of how it would impact local racial segregation. [Politico] – Eddie Small


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