Park Ave apartment owned by the former Yugoslavia finally sold

The dissolved union is selling off its properties in a global fire sale

TRD New York TRD WEEKEND EDITION /
Jun.June 10, 2018 08:20 PM

(Credit from back: Phillip Capper, Digital Library of Slovenia)

As part of a global fire sale for a country that no longer exists, a Park Avenue penthouse was recently sold for $12.1 million in an all-cash deal.

The luxurious apartment belonged to the former Yugoslavia, which consisted of countries now known as Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Serbia and Macedonia. The union broke up in 1992 as nationalist movements broke out throughout the previously unified state and brutal conflict erupted, as the BBC reported.

Now, over 20 years later, properties that were originally bought for the former Yugoslavia’s first president, Josip Broz Tito, and his government are finally being sold, according to the New York Post.

The sale of the 4,500-square-foot property on Park to an unnamed buyer closed last month. The unit has three terraces and was originally listed for $18 million, but the price was ultimately slashed by about $6 million. The penthouse has been empty since 1992 when Yugoslavia broke up and the last ambassador vacated, according to Douglas Elliman’s Tristan Harper, who handled the listing.

Harper told the Post representatives from Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Serbia and Macedonia were present to sign off on the deal. [NYP] Erin Hudson


Related Articles

arrow_forward_ios
356 Sackett Street (Google Maps, Elliman)

Brooklyn’s back: Luxury contract volume hits four-month high

Brooklyn’s back: Luxury contract volume hits four-month high
The Hillandale estate (Knight Frank)

260-acre Hillandale estate returns to market asking $49M

260-acre Hillandale estate returns to market asking $49M
Hong Kong

Foreign firms are vacating Hong Kong offices like never before

Foreign firms are vacating Hong Kong offices like never before
Mayor Bill de Blasio (Getty, Wikimedia)

Landlords challenge city laws protecting non-paying businesses

Landlords challenge city laws protecting non-paying businesses
Mayor Bill de Blasio and Dr. Oxiris Barbot (Getty, iStock)

Day care — and its landlords — get a lifeline

Day care — and its landlords — get a lifeline
From left: Gaw Capital Partners’ Goodwin Gaw, Howard Lorber of New Valley Group, Oyo CEO Ritesh Agarwal, Soho House's Ron Burkle, and Steven Witkoff of Witkoff Group (Getty)

TRD Insights: These hotel businesses got big PPP funding

TRD Insights: These hotel businesses got big PPP funding
394 Vanderbilt Avenue (Douglas Elliman)

As weather heats up, Brooklyn luxury market doesn’t

As weather heats up, Brooklyn luxury market doesn’t
The threat of eviction hangs heavily above immigrant families who have lost work as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. (Getty)

Eviction bans don’t always protect the most vulnerable

Eviction bans don’t always protect the most vulnerable
arrow_forward_ios

The Deal's newsletters give you the latest scoops, fresh headlines, marketing data, and things to know within the industry.

Loading...