Animation shop drawn to Industry City

Buck signs a lease for 30K sf at Sunset Park complex

TRD New York /
Jul.July 24, 2018 05:00 PM

Andrew Kimball and Industry City at 274 36th Street in Brooklyn (Credit: Pace University and Industry City)

Buck, a production company that specializes in animation, signed a lease for 30,000 square feet at Industry City.

The company is taking 15,000 square feet on each of the fifth and sixth floors at Building 5 in the Sunset Park complex, Crain’s reported.

Asking rents range from the high $30s to the low $40s per square foot, and Buck’s lease is for a term of 10 years.

The company will be relocating from its location at 11 Howard Street in Soho, where it currently occupies roughly 11,000 square feet.

“We wanted to be in Brooklyn, in a place that inspires our employees and excites our clients… everyone from Google to Instagram, Apple to Nike,” Buck principal Orion Tait told the publication. “Industry City delivers on that front, while also making us accessible to our employee base and giving us the flexibility to continue to grow.”

Brokers Ken Fishel and Jessica Jaber of Legacy Real Estate negotiated the lease on behalf of Buck.

Industry City has a growing roster of production-related tenants such as AbelCine, an audio-visual equipment supplier that occupies 44,000 square feet, drone-cinematography company Aerobo, film distributor FilmRise and 30 Ninjas, a digital entertainment company.

“We now have over 20 film-related tenants,” Industry City leasing director Kathe Chase said. “There’s an appeal for these companies to be in a location where they can collaborate and share ideas and where customers or clients can come in and meet with several players in one trip.”

A partnership of Jamestown, Belvedere Capital and Cammeby’s International owns the 5.3 million-square-foot Industry City complex. The owners are currently looking to rezone the campus in order to expand it up to 6.6 million square feet. [Crain’s] – Rich Bockmann

 

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