Just what every skyscraper needs: a gigantic 350-foot waterfall

The colossal water feature costs $118 per hour to run

New York Weekend Edition /
Aug.August 04, 2018 09:00 AM

(Credit: YouTube, Riaz Shah)

A gigantic waterfall cascading down the side of a skyscraper has received mixed reactions from locals in Guiyang, China.

The first impression when residents initially glimpsed water falling 350 feet–nearly the entire height of the 400-foot skyscraper–was concern. As cited by the New York Post, the Times of the U.K. noted that people “telephoned newspapers to report what they believed was a massive water leak.”

It was actually the dramatic reveal of a somewhat controversial water feature: a man-made waterfall that, at the cost of $118 per hour, only flows for about 10 to 20 minutes at a time.

Once the intention was clear, residents’ reactions ranged from “quite novel” and “very eye-catching,” to “terrible idea… They should really conserve energy instead of wasting it like that,” as Kanka News found out.

A representative from the tower’s property manager, Guizhou Ludiya Property Management, said the water was all recycled and stored in an underground reservoir. [NYP]


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