HUD is looking to make big changes to
fair-housing enforcement

Department wants to use grants to negotiate for less restrictive zoning

National /
Aug.August 13, 2018 11:30 AM

The Robert C. Weaver Federal Building in Washington, D.C. and Ben Carson (Credit: Wikipedia and Getty Images)

The Trump administration wants to use federal grants as leverage to get communities to reconsider their zoning codes to allow for more housing development.

It’s a shift in policy at the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, which under the Obama administration focused on integrating lower-income housing into wealthy neighborhoods, the Wall Street Journal reported.

HUD Secretary Ben Carson said restrictive zoning rules have limited home construction, thus driving up prices and making it more difficult for low-income families to afford homes.

He wants to use infrastructure grants from his department that communities use to build roads, sewers, bridges and other projects as a tool to negotiate for less restrictive zoning.

“I would incentivize people who really would like to get a nice juicy government grant” to revisit their zoning codes, he said.

“I want to encourage the development of mixed-income multifamily dwellings all over the place,” Carson added.

The change in policy is expected to undo one of Obama’s signature accomplishments at HUD, which turned to computer technology to make it easier for communities to comply with fair-housing rules.

But local officials in some parts of the country criticized the process, saying it was expensive and that the government was forcing them to place low-cost rental buildings in wealthy neighborhoods.

Carson was the subject of some criticism earlier this year when he spent $31,000 on a new dining room set for his Washington, D.C., office. In March, he proposed raising the amount low-income families receiving federal subsidies pay in rent and making it easier for property owners to impose work requirements. [WSJ] – Rich Bockmann


Related Articles

arrow_forward_ios
Secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development Ben Carson (Credit: Getty Images and iStock)
“Rich people are going to get richer anyway”: HUD Secretary Ben Carson dismisses concerns that Opportunity Zones will only benefit rich people
“Rich people are going to get richer anyway”: HUD Secretary Ben Carson dismisses concerns that Opportunity Zones will only benefit rich people
(Photo Illustration by The Real Deal with Getty Images)
Cooling Sun Belt markets lead canceled home contracts
Cooling Sun Belt markets lead canceled home contracts
(Illustration by The Real Deal with Getty)
How illegal Airbnbs fall through the cracks
How illegal Airbnbs fall through the cracks
From left: Boston Mayor Michelle Wu and South Boston Senator Nick Collins with Boston City Hall
Controversial transfer tax bill advances in Boston
Controversial transfer tax bill advances in Boston
City Planning chair Dan Garodnick, City Council member Julie Won, City Council member Marjorie Velázquez, City Council speaker Adrienne Adams (Illustration by Kevin Cifuentes for The Real Deal with Getty Images, NYC.gov, council.nyc.gov, Twitter)
The rezoning conundrum
The rezoning conundrum
Disappearing starter homes
New York City’s incredible shrinking starter home market
New York City’s incredible shrinking starter home market
(Photo Illustration by Steven Dilakian for The Real Deal)
Luxury housing market took its biggest dive in 10 years
Luxury housing market took its biggest dive in 10 years
(Illustration by Priyanka Modi for the Real Deal with Getty)
Contract signings for NYC homes diminish, as do new listings
Contract signings for NYC homes diminish, as do new listings
arrow_forward_ios

The Deal's newsletters give you the latest scoops, fresh headlines, marketing data, and things to know within the industry.

Loading...