Hong Kong real estate scion to launch new co-working brand in D.C.

The "dynamic working club" was designed for activists, artists and entrepreneurs

TRD New York TRD WEEKEND EDITION /
Sep.September 08, 2018 02:00 PM

(Credit: ILC, Mobilus In Mobili, Eget arbete/Wikimedia Commons)

Hong Kong real estate scion Katherine Lo, 36, is officially getting into the family business.

The daughter of Lo Ka Shui–the chairman of Hong Kong-based Great Eagle Holdings and owner of the luxury hotel chain Langham Hospitality Group–is launching her first U.S.-based venture this October, according to Forbes.

“About five years ago, my father sent me a challenge to create a hospitality brand that would anticipate the changing needs of the world he saw around him,” she told Forbes. “I took all my personal passions, such as the arts and social change, and channeled that into the creation of this new brand.”

Known as Eaton House, Lo’s concept is a high-end co-working space founded on progressive politics with a carefully-screened pool of members–only 400 for the forthcoming D.C. location.

“They could be in their twenties or seventies, but they’re spiritually of the same mindset. Neo-beatnik, left-leaning, literary, intellectual, artistic. Someone who is nourished and inspired by being here. That person,” is welcome, said Lo.

And if someone such as Corey Lewandowski popped by, as the Washingtonian asked her, Lo responded that “we’ll donate the proceeds [of their purchased service] to a cause they probably wouldn’t support.”

Membership costs range from $400 for a single desk to $4,500 per month for a six-person office. The club’s space also comes with a 50-seat screening room, a computer lab with editing software and a wellness studio for members. A flagship restaurant, cafe and adjoining hotel are also part of the club’s footprint.

The D.C. location is the first American outpost for the brand–the original Eaton House is already open in Hong Kong. Lo told Forbes she plans to open clubhouses in San Francisco and Seattle within the next two years. [Forbes]Erin Hudson


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