Construction worker falls at Soho development site

Victim hit head at Arch Companies’ 11 Greene Street, but avoided serious injury

TRD New York /
Oct.October 01, 2018 08:45 AM

11 Greene Street and Jeff Simpson (Credit: Arch Companies and Google Maps)

A construction worker fell on the job site at Arch Companies’ Soho rental development project but escaped serious injury.

The worker hit his head as he fell from the fourth floor to the third floor at 11 Greene street shortly after 2:30 p.m. Friday, the Daily News reported.

“The medic tried to go up in a tower ladder,” Assane Fall, a private sanitation worker who watched rescuers help the worker, told the newspaper. “They brought [the worker] down in a basket … He was bleeding from the head when they put him in the ambulance.”

The victim, who was not identified, was taken to Bellevue Hospital for observation, but did not suffer serious injuries, according to the Daily News.

Arch Companies, headed by CEO Jeff Simpson, took over the project at 11 Greene Street from Thor Equities, and in March secured a $45 million construction loan from Maxim Capital Group.

The project will have 31 luxury rental units, and is scheduled to be completed next year. Workers have already finished three stories of the seven-story building. [NYDN] – Rich Bockmann


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