Here is how landlords will be impacted by the city’s new tenant harassment law

More than 1,000 buildings will be subject to the new law

New York /
Oct.October 15, 2018 10:15 AM

Mayor Bill de Blasio walking out of an apartment (Credit: Getty Images)

Mayor Bill de Blasio’s administration is implementing a new anti-harassment law for landlords.

The city announced the launch of the Certification of No Harassment (CONH) Pilot Program, Curbed reported. The new law requires landlords to meet specific certifications ensuring harassment hasn’t taken place — in order to get construction permits for big alterations.

More than 1,000 buildings with about 26,000 units will be subject to the pilot program, the report said. The measure was approved by the City Council in November.

The included buildings are mainly located in neighborhoods that were recently rezoned or are slated for rezoning. The law aims to make sure owners don’t harass law-abiding tenants into leaving their homes.

The Housing Litigation Division will investigate instances if needed. Property owners with violations could be denied permits for alterations or demolition for several years, the report said. [Curbed] — Meenal Vamburkar


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