Former Mel Brooks home shaves a half million off asking price

The comedy legend and filmmaker owned the Hamptons plot for a decade

New York Weekend Edition /
Nov.November 17, 2018 01:06 PM

Mel Brooks and his late wife, Ann Bancroft (Credit: Georges Biard)

The listing price for a 1968 home once owned by comedy legend and filmmaker Mel Brooks has been cut to $11.5 million after eight months on the market at $12 million.

Brooks and his late wife, Ann Bancroft, acquired the property, which is located on a narrow spit of Hamptons land between the Atlantic Ocean and Mecox Bay, in 2000 for $3 million. The house was sold by Brooks for $5.3 million in 2010, and traded again in early 2014 for $9 million.

After some freshening up, the property was listed for sale later that year at $11.5 million, but seems to have found no takers. In the years since, the asking price has climbed as high as $12.5 million before sliding back down to $11.5 million last month.

The three-bedroom, three-bath cottage at 1131 Flying Point Road features wood-beamed ceilings, hardwood floors, and a brick fireplace. However, the listing suggests replacing the 2000-square foot house with a larger structure and pool, to better utilize the roughly one-acre plot.

Brown Harris Stevens agent Mary Ann Cinelli represents the listing. [Curbed] — Kevin Sun


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