Faced with high land prices, developers are turning to oddly-shaped lots across the city

But the sites can be difficult and expensive to build on, and demand is increasing

New York /
Feb.February 15, 2019 09:30 AM

321 East 60th Street (Credit: Google Maps)

The future of affordable housing in the city might look a little…funny.

Developers looking for new opportunities are building on lots previously ignored because they were too small, too narrow, or just too weirdly-shaped, according to the New York Times.

There are 10,516 acres of vacant land with residential zoning scattered across the city, although only a fraction of them can realistically be built on. But developers and architects are finding inventive ways to build on overlooked spaces.

One example is Dunn Development’s Parkside Terrace in the Bronx. The site — which the developers bought for around $45 a square foot, while nearby lots were selling for closer to $60 a square foot — contained a large rock outcropping. Instead of removing the rock, architects built an 80-unit rental building above and around it.

The cheaper land, coupled with state subsidies, resulted in a mix of below-market-rate apartments.

“We’re considering sites that, 10 years ago, we wouldn’t even have looked at,” said Martin Dunn, president of Dunn Development.

At 321 East 60th Street in Lenox Hill, Azimuth Development Group and Aufgang Architects built a 21-unit affordable rental building on a curved lot that was previously a parking lot.

The lot’s shape and proximity to the Queensboro Bridge and the Roosevelt Island Tramway created construction challenges. Instead of using a crane, Azimuth parked a cement truck on a nearby sidewalk and poured cement through a hose, finishing one floor every 10 days. The process took as long as steel-frame construction, but was about 20 percent more expensive. [NYT] – Decca Muldowney


Related Articles

arrow_forward_ios
L&L Holding’s David Levinson and Columbia Property Trust's Nelson Mills with a rendering of 261 11th Avenue (L&L, Columbia Property Trust, Terminal Warehouse)
L&L, Columbia Property Trust land $1.3B loan for Chelsea office project
L&L, Columbia Property Trust land $1.3B loan for Chelsea office project
Towns and cities have begun restricting housing construction to save their supply of H2O. (iStock)
“Why are we building houses if we don’t have enough water?”: Towns react to scarcity
“Why are we building houses if we don’t have enough water?”: Towns react to scarcity
Fires raging in the western United States are beginning to have a negative impact on lumber output. (Getty)
Raging wildfires threaten lumber market, home builders’ costs
Raging wildfires threaten lumber market, home builders’ costs
A rendering of 19 Hausman Street (M Development)
Nightmare darkens for largest Brooklyn condo project of 2019
Nightmare darkens for largest Brooklyn condo project of 2019
SL Green CEO Marc Holliday with 461 Fifth Avenue and 220 East 197th Street in Fordham (SL Green, Google Maps)
SL Green pays $28M for full control of Midtown office building
SL Green pays $28M for full control of Midtown office building
From left: a rendering of 286 Rider Avenue, Ben Harlev and Heritage Equity Partners' Toby Moskovits (Fischer Makooi Architect, Moskovits via Sasha Maslov, Ben Harlev via NadlanCityNY)
Lender tries to seize Toby Moskovits’ Bronx apartment project
Lender tries to seize Toby Moskovits’ Bronx apartment project
A rendering of 45 Park Place and Sharif El Gamal (SOMA, Getty)
45 Park Place mired in involuntary bankruptcy, foreclosure proceedings
45 Park Place mired in involuntary bankruptcy, foreclosure proceedings
Mayor Bill de Blasio and 1206 Westchester Avenue in the Bronx (Getty, Google Maps)
NYC buys 14 more cluster sites for $122M
NYC buys 14 more cluster sites for $122M
arrow_forward_ios

The Deal's newsletters give you the latest scoops, fresh headlines, marketing data, and things to know within the industry.

Loading...