One of Long Island’s last Gatsby-era mansions is hitting the market

The price is “upon request”
April 29, 2019 02:23PM

Lands' End Manor at 8 Lands End Road in Locust Valley (Credit: Lands End Manor)

Lands’ End Manor at 8 Lands End Road in Locust Valley (Credit: Lands End Manor)

Lands End Manor — one of the last Gatsby-era mansions on Long Island’s Gold Coast — is hitting the market for the first time in more than four decades. But the price is “upon request.”

The value of the property, which dates back to 1926, is estimated to be north of $35 million, broker Dolly Lenz told Mansion Global. Lenz is handling the listing for the property.

Lands' End Manor at 8 Lands End Road in Locust Valley (Credit: Lands End Manor)

Lands’ End Manor at 8 Lands End Road in Locust Valley (Credit: Lands End Manor)

The estate’s current owners are Sherrell Aston and Muffie Potter Aston. Aston is among the world’s leading plastic surgeons and chairman of the Department of Plastic Surgery at Manhattan Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital — and his wife, Muffie, is a former executive of Van Cleef & Arpels.

Walker and Gillette, a prestigious 20th century architectural firm, designed the home. It was built for Harvey Dow Gibson — a businessman who was president of Liberty National Bank, which is now Bankers Trust, as well as Manufacturers Trust, which eventually became Citibank — and his wife Helen Whitney. The family entertained often, and their houseguests included Zelda and F. Scott Fitzgerald, the author of, “The Great Gatsby.”

Only one other family lived on the property since 1929, the report said.

The Astons began putting together the 32-acre estate in the mid-1980s. The 13,000-square-foot main house has six bedrooms, and an attached two-bedroom staff apartment has its own separate entrance as well as access into the main house.

The estate also includes a six-bedroom cottage, a five-stall stable with two caretaker cottages, a greenhouse, a pool with a Georgian-style pool house, and a gazebo. There are seven gardens designed by architect Frederick Law Olmstead, who designed Central Park.

The Astons said they’re moving because they no longer use the property as much with their twin daughters having grown older. Their primary residence is on the Upper East Side. [Mansion Global] — Meenal Vamburkar