NYC hospitals may soon turn to hotels for extra beds

The sites would be used to treat patients who don't have the virus

New York /
Mar.March 19, 2020 11:15 AM
 
EMC Commissioner Deanne Criswell (Credit: Criswell by Ron Adar / Echoes Wire/Barcroft Media via Getty Images; Tim36272 via Wikipedia Commons)

EMC Commissioner Deanne Criswell (Credit: Criswell by Ron Adar / Echoes Wire/Barcroft Media via Getty Images; Tim36272 via Wikipedia Commons)

As the city works to accommodate the growing number of COVID-19 patients, it is considering a plan to convert hotels into hospitals for patients who don’t have the virus.

In an interview with the Wall Street Journal Wednesday, New York’s emergency management commissioner, Deanne Criswell, said the hotel facilities would be used for “those non-COVID patients who are really minor but need care.”

Details about the plan, including financial arrangements between hotels and the city, remain unclear.

The city is considering several options as it rushes to contain the virus. There were nearly 2,000 confirmed cases of coronavirus in New York City as of Wednesday, nearly double the day before.

The hotel industry is feeling the effects, with occupancy plummeting as low as 15 percent. Several that were already in financial strife are now in an extremely perilous position.

Some hotels are already being used by the city for quarantine, according to the Journal. Criswell said they could also be used to house healthcare workers, too.

To increase capacity at existing hospitals, patients will be discharged sooner, elective surgeries will be cancelled and areas including cafeterias and parking lots will be converted into intensive care units, according to the city. The plan is expected to create another 7,000 beds.

“I’ve ordered all my colleagues to identify all spaces that can be converted immediately to medical use,” de Blasio said in a press briefing Monday. “We are going to be constantly building out medical facilities and creating them where they’ve never existed before and retrofitting facilities that have nothing to do with health care.” [WSJ] — Sylvia Varnham O’Regan


Related Articles

arrow_forward_ios
Before the pandemic, national tenants paid 94 percent of rent. (Getty)

Retail rent collections rebound to 90%

Retail rent collections rebound to 90%
Cindat Capital Management CEO Greg Peng and Hersha Hospitality Trust CEO Jay Shah with 51 Nassau Street (Google Maps)

7 Manhattan hotels head to auction block

7 Manhattan hotels head to auction block
(iStock)

Leisure and hospitality lost 500K jobs in December

Leisure and hospitality lost 500K jobs in December
Carmine’s battles landlord over unpaid rent. (Getty, Carmine's)

Carmine’s in Times Square sues landlord to stave off eviction

Carmine’s in Times Square sues landlord to stave off eviction
The “Raising The Bar Recovery Fund” will distribute a collective $3 million to eligible businesses across New York State. (iStock)

Struggling restaurants to get $5K lifeline from state

Struggling restaurants to get $5K lifeline from state
Colony Capital chairman Tom Barrack (Getty, iStock)

Goodbye, LA: Barrack’s Colony packs bags for Florida

Goodbye, LA: Barrack’s Colony packs bags for Florida
Empty offices, shut down retail stores, closing restaurants and literal fires are among the biggest real estate disasters of 2020. (Getty)

Worst of the worst: The real estate disasters of 2020

Worst of the worst: The real estate disasters of 2020
Clockwise from left: Donald Trump, Joe Biden, Airbnb CEO Brian Chesky, Opendoor CEO Eric Wu, Black Lives Matter protests (Illustration by The Real Deal)

For real estate, a year like no other

For real estate, a year like no other
arrow_forward_ios

The Deal's newsletters give you the latest scoops, fresh headlines, marketing data, and things to know within the industry.

Loading...