City may allow other types of construction

New guidance suggests Department of Buildings has discretion

New York /
Mar.March 30, 2020 06:30 PM
Melanie La Rocca, Commissioner of the New York City Department of Buildings

Melanie La Rocca, commissioner of the New York City Department of Buildings

The city may allow more types of construction under the state’s partial ban.

In guidance issued by the Department of Buildings on Monday, the agency stated that in addition to utilities, health care facilities, homeless shelters and affordable housing, “other essential construction as approved by the Department” would be exempt from the state’s “New York on Pause” order.

Until at least April 15, employees of all non-essential businesses are prohibited from reporting to work. Initially, all construction was considered essential, but last week, the Empire State Development Corp. released new guidelines that restricted most construction types.

It’s unclear what other construction city’s buildings agency may approve. A message seeking more information wasn’t immediately returned. Starting Tuesday, however, owners and construction companies can start filing applications for their work to be considered essential.

The Department of Buildings also further defined what is considered affordable housing and thus spared from the construction ban. Multifamily projects in the city where at least 30 percent of the units are income-restricted are exempt, as are projects that are part of the city’s inclusionary housing programs (either voluntary or mandatory), according to the agency.

Many developments receive the Affordable New York tax break, formerly known as 421a. Most options available under the program call for at least 30 percent of the units to be affordable, meaning that many rental projects under construction could be considered essential.

The agency’s guidance also appears to allow work on private or multifamily buildings to address emergency conditions or to house specific populations, such as victims of domestic violence. If it is within public housing, work related to heating season is permitted.

Write to Kathryn Brenzel at [email protected]


Related Articles

arrow_forward_ios
Eli Weiss and a rendering of 3875 9th Avenue
Developers land $414M for Inwood project after waiting out rezoning fight
Developers land $414M for Inwood project after waiting out rezoning fight
(Photo Illustration by The Real Deal with Getty)
Office attendance finally reaches 50%
Office attendance finally reaches 50%
Redeemer’s Timothy Keller and 150 East 91st Street (Getty, Google Maps, Redeemer)
Redeemer Presbyterian’s UES development plans vex co-op residents
Redeemer Presbyterian’s UES development plans vex co-op residents
275 Atlantic Avenue (Illustration by Kevin Cifuentes for The Real Deal with Getty Images, Thomson200/CC0/via Wikimedia Commons)
Brooklyn leads NYC in demolition permits — by a wide margin
Brooklyn leads NYC in demolition permits — by a wide margin
Rinaldi Group’s Robert Baselice (Getty, LinkedIn/Robert Baselice)
Kickback city: Rinaldi exec accused of fleecing developers
Kickback city: Rinaldi exec accused of fleecing developers
Urban Umbrella's Benjamin Krall with 500 Main Street (Getty, Loopnet, Crunchbase)
Urban Umbrella brings its artful scaffolding to Texas
Urban Umbrella brings its artful scaffolding to Texas
RiseBoro Community Partnership CEO Scott Short and 75 Linden Street in Bushwick (Getty, RiseBoro Community Partnership, Google Maps)
RiseBoro’s passive house retrofits save landlord a bundle
RiseBoro’s passive house retrofits save landlord a bundle
From left: BTEA's Louis Coletti, Assembly member Rodneyse Bichotte Hermelyn and Sen. James Sanders Jr. (Getty; Illustration by Kevin Rebong for The Real Deal)
Hochul signs bill to raise fines for construction companies
Hochul signs bill to raise fines for construction companies
arrow_forward_ios

The Deal's newsletters give you the latest scoops, fresh headlines, marketing data, and things to know within the industry.

Loading...