NYC to allow store owners to sell wares on sidewalks

Initiative modeled after Open Restaurants begins Oct. 31

New York /
Oct.October 28, 2020 02:31 PM
City’s new Open Storefronts program will allow shop owners to sell their wares on sidewalks (Getty)

City’s new Open Storefronts program will allow shop owners to sell their wares on sidewalks (Getty)

The city’s successful Open Restaurants program has inspired a similar initiative, this time for shop owners.

Mayor Bill de Blasio announced that the city will begin an Open Storefront program on Oct. 31, modeled after the program that has allowed restaurants to serve diners outside at reduced capacity. The new program will allow 40,000 small businesses to sell their goods in front of their stores.

Open Storefronts Siting Requirements (Department of Transportation)

Open Storefronts Siting Requirements (Department of Transportation)

“Everyone knows this is such a crucial time of the year for every small business,” Mayor Bill de Blasio said during a press conference Wednesday. “We want them to maximize it.”

There are some caveats: Stores will need to keep an eight-foot clearing between their setups and the curb so that pedestrians can still use the sidewalk. Any equipment will need to be brought in at the end of the day, and shops can’t infringe on the space of adjacent storefronts.

The program applies only to those retailers who have ground-floor businesses, with stores given priority over street vendors.

The Open Restaurants program launched in June, and more than 10,000 dining establishments have opted in since. The de Blasio administration announced in September that it would be made permanent and year-round, although questions of how restaurants will thrive in colder months persist.

The Open Storefronts program does have a firm end date: It’ll run through Dec. 31.





    Related Articles

    arrow_forward_ios
    The New York Life Sciences and Biotechnology Center at First Avenue and 41st Street (NY Life Sciences)
    Life sciences leasing breaks annual record in five months
    Life sciences leasing breaks annual record in five months
    RSA President Joseph Strasburg (Rent Stabilization Association)
    Landlords plea for water rate freeze ahead of vote
    Landlords plea for water rate freeze ahead of vote
    The commercial market was hit hard by the pandemic, and property tax revenue is expected to fall 5 percent. (iStock)
    Tax bills show how much Covid devalued NYC real estate
    Tax bills show how much Covid devalued NYC real estate
    Richard Segal of Seavest Investment Group, David Marx of Marx Development Group and 902 Quentin Road in Brooklyn (Photos via Seavest Investment Group, Marx Development Group and VRMNY)
    Westchester firm buys $54M Brooklyn medical building
    Westchester firm buys $54M Brooklyn medical building
    Real Estate EFTs See Investment Amid Pandemic Recovery
    Why investors are rushing into real estate ETFs
    Why investors are rushing into real estate ETFs
    Manhattan sublease surge shows signs of slowing
    Manhattan sublease scourge finally abates
    Manhattan sublease scourge finally abates
    Blooma founder Shayne Skaff (LinkedIn, iStock)
    CRE fintech startup Blooma nabs $15M in funding
    CRE fintech startup Blooma nabs $15M in funding
    Distressed real estate investors are digging through commercial mortgage-backed securities to seize, fix and flip troubled properties. (iStock)
    Distressed investors tap throwback strategy, target CMBS
    Distressed investors tap throwback strategy, target CMBS
    arrow_forward_ios

    The Deal's newsletters give you the latest scoops, fresh headlines, marketing data, and things to know within the industry.

    Loading...