Blood Center rezoning on Upper East Side approved

Proposed 600,000-square-foot campus will get City Council consideration

New York /
Sep.September 23, 2021 11:00 AM
Longfellow Real Estate Partners CEO Adam Sichol with renderings of 310 East 67th Street (Friends UES, Rendering by DBOX, Longfellow)

Longfellow Real Estate Partners CEO Adam Sichol with renderings of 310 East 67th Street (Friends UES, Rendering by DBOX, Longfellow)

A controversial plan to expand the New York Blood Center in the Upper East Side has advanced through the City Planning Commission.

The commission voted 8-to-2 in favor of rezoning for the Center East project. The City Council will consider the proposal for the 600,000-square-foot life science hub, according to Real Estate Weekly.

The Blood Center, located at 310 East 67th Street, is aiming to build a state-of-the-art facility that will play a major part in the city’s life science innovation. The three-story headquarters would be replaced by a 334-foot building.

New facilities would serve as offices and labs for the Blood Center, as well as for other life science firms and medical partners.

“Our vision for a state-of-the-art life science facility will not only ensure the nonprofit Blood Center continues to provide safe, affordable blood services to the region’s hospitals, but enable the center to significantly expand its life-saving research on COVID-19 and blood-related diseases in collaboration with institutions and biotechnology partners all under the same roof,” said Rob Purvis, an executive vice president with the Blood Center.

The hub is being developed with Longfellow Real Estate Partners.

The project is facing some fierce pushback, including City Council member Ben Kallos and the community around the Blood Center.

A major point of contention has been the size of the building, which prompted the rezoning proposal through the ULURP process. The maximum height of buildings in the area is 75 feet high, meaning the proposed tower would more than quadruple that mark. The proposed height sparked complaints the building could cast shadows over a nearby school and park.

Another point of criticism focused on the perceived lack of transparency surrounding the facility’s potential work. The lab is expected to process microbes “indigenous or exotic, and they can cause serious or potentially lethal disease through respiratory transmission,” according to the CDC.

[REW] — Holden Walter-Warner





    Related Articles

    arrow_forward_ios
    270 W Montauk Hwy, Hampton Bays, NY (Loopnet)
    Legendary Hampton Bays bar up for sale
    Legendary Hampton Bays bar up for sale
    Prologis Chairman and CEO Hamid Moghadam (Getty, Prologis)
    Industrial space “effectively sold out” amid leasing frenzy, Prologis says
    Industrial space “effectively sold out” amid leasing frenzy, Prologis says
    Starwood raises $10B for distressed real estate plays
    Starwood raises $10B for distressed real estate plays
    Starwood raises $10B for distressed real estate plays
    Widow of late General Electric CEO Jack Welch buys $23M UES mansion
    Widow of late General Electric CEO Jack Welch buys $23M UES mansion
    Widow of late General Electric CEO Jack Welch buys $23M UES mansion
    Aulder Capital CEO Jonah Bamberger and 162-164 East 82nd Street (Rosewood Realty Group, Slate Property Group)
    Two Upper East Side apartment buildings head to foreclosure sale
    Two Upper East Side apartment buildings head to foreclosure sale
    Stripes founder Ken Fox and a rendering of 40 10th Avenue (Stripes, Neoscape)
    Private equity firm carves out 14K sf at Aurora’s Solar Carve building
    Private equity firm carves out 14K sf at Aurora’s Solar Carve building
    Resurrection! Work resumes on stalled Clinton Hill residential project
    Resurrection! Work resumes on stalled Clinton Hill residential project
    Resurrection! Work resumes on stalled Clinton Hill residential project
    State Sen. Jabari Brisport and a rendering of 840 Atlantic Avenue (Getty, IMC Architecture, iStock)
    How a senator’s vampire politics hurt real estate — and NYC
    How a senator’s vampire politics hurt real estate — and NYC
    arrow_forward_ios

    The Deal's newsletters give you the latest scoops, fresh headlines, marketing data, and things to know within the industry.

    Loading...