Lonicera Partners developing 314-unit building in Brooklyn

Developer filed plans for mixed-use project downtown

New York /
Sep.September 23, 2021 03:39 PM
15 Hanover Place in Brooklyn (Google Maps)

15 Hanover Place in Brooklyn (Google Maps)

A 314-unit, mixed-use building could be on its way to Downtown Brooklyn.

Lonicera Partners filed a permit application for construction at 15 Hanover Place. The planned building would span 244,085 square feet with a height of 348 feet, reaching 34 stories, according to PincusCo. Fogarty Finger is listed as the architect for the project.

The mixed-use building would have space on the ground floor for multiple retail outlets. There would also be an amenity space and a lobby for residents of the building below a 63-car parking lot.

In addition to units on most of the floors, there will also be amenity space towards the top and bottom of the residential floors. Additionally, a terrace is planned for the roof and the cellar would include a fitness room, game room, yoga studio and kid’s room.

The project is slated to cover five different tax lots, but only one is confirmed to be owned by Lonicera, which bought one of the lots in July for slightly under $12.8 million. The largest lot is owned by the Lieberman Group, per city records. The three remaining parcels are owned by different companies.

The site has been ripe for controversy in the past. Investor Abraham Leifer filed a lawsuit in 2016 against the Lieberman Group after the owner terminated a contract to sell 15 Hanover Place for $44 million. Leifer was working on developing a $70 million assemblage at the time. The following year, Leifer sued again.

Lonicera was founded in 2010 and has three properties in Downtown Brooklyn in its portfolio. Notably, the company’s purchase of 275 Livingston Street — the parcel Lonicera owns for the development site — was from Leifer, who acquired the property in 2018 for $14.8 million.

[PincusCo] — Holden Walter-Warner





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