Harlem River Houses approved for $130M facelift

Improvements to include security upgrades and restored playgrounds

New York /
Oct.October 25, 2021 03:30 PM

Donald C. Notice (Executive Director, West Harlem Group Assistance, Inc.), Alexa Sewell (President, Settlement Housing Fund, Inc.) and view of historic public housing complex in West Harlem (Google Maps, LinkedIn, whgainc.org)

The Landmarks Preservation Committee approved a major renovation for a historic public housing complex in West Harlem.

The Harlem River Houses, located between West 151st Street and West 153rd Street along Harlem River Drive and Macombs Place, received approval on a $130 million renovation, according to YIMBY. Work on the renovation could reportedly begin as soon as the winter.

The renovations range from exterior improvements to security upgrades and sustainability changes. New trees and planters will be installed across the six-building complex, as well as a fountain in the western portion of the complex. Three playgrounds will also be restored, along with a central courtyard and an amphitheater.

Security upgrades are set to include chain-link fences installed around the children’s playgrounds and cameras, failing light fixtures and cracks in the pavement will be repaired, per YIMBY.

The complex’s retail storefronts can expect new aluminum and restored pavement. For the residential properties, exterior brickwork is set to either be cleaned, repaired or replaced, depending on the needs of each building.

Curtis + Ginsberg Architects are part of the design team, as are Higgins Qusebarth & Partners, NV5 and Rand Engineering & Architecture.

Settlement Housing Fund and West Harlem Group Assistance are the developers behind the project, which YIMBY noted comes two years after NYCHA transferred management to the firms.

West Harlem Group Assistance has previously faced pushback from tenants who claimed to have been injured in buildings managed by the Harlem-based nonprofit. In 2014, several residents sued the organization  for injuries they alleged resulted from deteriorating conditions like leaky ceilings, crumbling walls and broken pipes.

Settlement Housing Fund, another nonprofit landlord, made headlines last month after it was revealed as the agent for the entity behind a deal valuing Starrett City, a massive Brooklyn affordable housing complex, at $1.8 billion.

[YIMBY] — Holden Walter-Warner





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