San Francisco’s second-most expensive apartment hits market for $30M

The Pacific Heights co-op's bottom floor was once a ballroom

National Weekend Edition /
Jan.January 29, 2022 10:49 AM

The home features views of San Francisco Bay. (Jacob Elliott for Sotheby’s International Realty)

Get ready to have a ball.

A giant apartment in one of San Francisco’s chicest buildings is on the market for $30 million — the second-most-expensive asking price for a co-op in the city right now — and includes a ground floor space that was once a ballroom.

According to Mansion Global, the 7,800-square-foot apartment inside a nearly 100-year-old Beaux-Arts building in Pacific Heights also has four bedrooms, nine bathrooms — and 12-foot ceilings and Palladian windows in the former ballroom space.

The only two-level unit in the building, it has views of the Golden Gate Bridge, Russian Hill and Alcatraz Island in San Francisco Bay.

The unit also has the most outdoor space in the building, with six terraces on three sides of the structure — a big selling point, according to Gregg Lynn of Sotheby’s International Realty’s San Francisco Brokerage, who is managing its sale.

“What we’ve learned during Covid-19 is that apartment living must be matched with generous outdoor space,” he told the publication. “People don’t want to live in single-family homes, but they don’t want to live in condominiums or cooperatives without outdoor space. This has six terraces on three sides of the building.”

Other amenities inside of the home include a great room with a fireplace and views of the bay, a library and conservatory with an entrance to one of the terraces and Versailles-patterned hardwood floors, according to the listing. There’s also an oversized chef’s kitchen with doubled-up appliances, a formal dining room, and a breakfast nook.

The primary bedroom suite has two marble bathrooms and, dual dressing rooms. The bottom floor has a private entrance into the former ballroom to go with the doorman entrance to the building.

And shoppers looking to break the bank on their next home purchase won’t have to go far if they want to spend even more. The city’s most expensive co-op listing — at $45 million — is located in the same building, according to the report.

[Mansion Global] — Vince DiMiceli





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