Likely Adams pick Carlo Scissura won’t run EDC after all

New York Building Congress CEO under ethics scrutiny

New York /
Feb.February 08, 2022 09:45 AM

Carlo Scissura, chief executive officer, New York Building Congress (New York Building Congress, iStock/Illustration by Steven Dilakian for The Real Deal)

Mayor Eric Adams is going to need a new candidate to run the Economic Development Corporation, because his first reported pick for the role is out of the running.

Carlo Scissura is staying on as president and CEO of New York Building Congress, according to a statement to The City. The decision comes after a report from the outlet showed Scissura was paid to advocate for a property owner without registering to do so.

“This is the best way that I can serve the people of our city and state at this crucial time, to guarantee we build reliable mass transit, schools, open spaces and other crucial infrastructure that moves New York forward,”Scissura told The City of stepping back from the economic development gig.

The Real Deal first reported in early January Adams was expected to appoint Scissura to run the EDC.

The stint would have come after his work as president and CEO of New York Building Congress since 2017, advocating for large-scale infrastructure projects like the Gateway tunnel project and the redevelopment of Sunnyside Yards.

But the cracks in Scissura’s road to the role began to show after sources told The City its report prompted City Hall to turn up its vetting. Scissura also reportedly retained a lawyer.

The report said Scissura in 2018 agreed to help property owner Tim Ziss with the sale of five parcels in southern Brooklyn including a site of a former Nathan’s Famous in Dyker Heights, which ultimately sold for $25 million. Scissura also agreed to help Ziss take over the Bridgeview III affordable housing complex in Astoria, Queens.

Scissura told The City he informed Ziss he couldn’t do the work described in the contract, which should have been registered as lobbying, experts told the outlet.

Adams’ search for political appointees has been wrought with controversy.

After the city’s Conflicts of Interest Board found issue with the newly elected mayor nominating his brother to lead security, Adams reduced his brother’s salary from $210,000 to $1. Phil Banks was tapped to be deputy mayor of public safety, despite ties to an NYPD corruption case.

Adams last month introduced Jessica Katz as chief housing officer, a new position The Real Deal reported is likely spun off from the former role of deputy mayor of housing and economic development. Former Bronx borough president Adolfo Carrión Jr. will also serve as commissioner of the Department of Housing Preservation and Development.

[The City] — Holden Walter-Warner





    Related Articles

    arrow_forward_ios
    Gary LaBarbera, James Whelan, Eric Adams, Tiffany Cabán and Kathy Hochul (Getty, iStock / illustration by Ilya Hourie for The Real Deal)
    Council backs off sabotage of 421a
    Council backs off sabotage of 421a
    President Joe Biden (Getty, iStock)
    Biden unveils his answer to high home prices
    Biden unveils his answer to high home prices
    Mayor Eric Adams
    Join Mayor Eric Adams at TRD’s NYC Real Estate Showcase + Forum
    Join Mayor Eric Adams at TRD’s NYC Real Estate Showcase + Forum
    Town of East Hampton supervisor Peter Van Scoyoc and Blade's Rob Wiesenthal with East Hampton Airport (East Hampton, Wikipedia)
    East Hampton Airport closure at hand, except…
    East Hampton Airport closure at hand, except…
    Tom Suozzi
    What can Tom Suozzi do for real estate?
    What can Tom Suozzi do for real estate?
    (iStock, Illustration by Shea Monahan for the Real Deal)
    As lawmakers race to electrify buildings, industry pushes back
    As lawmakers race to electrify buildings, industry pushes back
    Gov. Kathy Hochul (Getty, iStock)
    With 421a dying, apartment project financing “has come to a stop”
    With 421a dying, apartment project financing “has come to a stop”
    Tenants and landlords are in a tug-of-war (iStock)
    Can tenants have it both ways?
    Can tenants have it both ways?
    arrow_forward_ios

    The Deal's newsletters give you the latest scoops, fresh headlines, marketing data, and things to know within the industry.

    Loading...