Shame game: Queens landlord calls out tenant who stopped paying rent

“MY TENANTS ON THE FIRST FLOOR ARE NOT PAYING RENT” reads the signs hanging above the rental unit

New York Weekend Edition /
Mar.March 20, 2022 12:10 PM
The home on 175th Street in Springfield Gardens (Google Maps, spinkii.baddest via TikTok)

The home on 175th Street in Springfield Gardens (Google Maps, spinkii.baddest via TikTok)

A Queens landlord who is trying to evict tenants he says owes him more than $17,000 in back rent went has taken his fight public, hanging two signs on the home he shares with the renters announcing to the world — and everyone driving by on the nearby Belt Parkway — that they are not handing over their monthly bill.

The New York Post is reporting that homeowners Calvin and Jean Thompson are using all legal means to evict Marie and Eugene Lamour and their daughter from the downstairs apartment of their two-family home in Springfield Gardens.

But while the case winds through a Queens housing court besieged by a historic backlog thanks to the pandemic, they took the liberty of letting passersby know exactly what is going on, according to the report.

“MY TENANTS ON THE FIRST FLOOR ARE NOT PAYING RENT” reads the signs hanging above the rental unit and on the side of the building, which subsequently got noticed by users of TikTok.

A family member of the landlords said he hopes the sign will shame his tenants into coughing up the dough.

“The signs are very embarrassing and shameful for them,” Thompsons’ son, Calvin Jr., told the newspaper. “That’s the only voice we have at this stage: freedom of speech.”

Back in July, Thompsons raised the rent on the Lamours’ three-bedroom apartment for the first time in nine years, according to the report, from $1,800 a month to $1,900.

But instead of paying the five percent increase, Kathia claimed she tried to drop off the usual $1,800 in rent, but the Thompsons refused to take it — so she stopped paying altogether.

“I don’t think a $100 increase for almost a decade of living is unreasonable,” Calvin Jr. told the newspaper. “There are plenty of landlords in our situation because of COVID. A lot of eviction cases are backlogged. She knows this and is going to ride this out.”

A lawyer for the Lamours, Andreas Spiker, told the Post the sign is a form of harassment and will only hurt the landlord’s case.

[New York Post] — Vince DiMiceli





    Related Articles

    arrow_forward_ios
    (iStock)
    NYC rents soar as Covid deals die
    NYC rents soar as Covid deals die
    From left: Developer Bruce Teitelbaum and Durst Organization CEO Douglas Durst and 44-02 Vernon Boulevard (Getty Images, LoopNet, iStock)
    “A tremendous ordeal”: Lawyers in $97M Durst buyout slam case
    “A tremendous ordeal”: Lawyers in $97M Durst buyout slam case
    964 Park Place (Google Maps, iStock)
    Eviction redux: Crown Heights family faces second ouster
    Eviction redux: Crown Heights family faces second ouster
    Durst's Douglas Durst and 44-02 Vernon Boulevard (The Durst Organization, Google Maps)
    Investors in huge LIC project buy out Durst for $97M
    Investors in huge LIC project buy out Durst for $97M
    New York, Evictions, Court
    Eviction filings pick up as housing courts get busy
    Eviction filings pick up as housing courts get busy
    Essex Property Trust's Michael J. Schall (Essex Property Trust, iStock)
    Essex Property earnings beat estimates as Bay Area rents recover
    Essex Property earnings beat estimates as Bay Area rents recover
    Zumper's Jeff Andrews (Zumper, iStock) Miami, Pricing
    Miami overtakes Boston as third-priciest city for renters
    Miami overtakes Boston as third-priciest city for renters
    A photo illustration of 112-51 Northern Boulevard (Fleet Financial Group, iStock)
    SEC looking into EB-5 fraud allegations against Queens developer
    SEC looking into EB-5 fraud allegations against Queens developer
    arrow_forward_ios

    The Deal's newsletters give you the latest scoops, fresh headlines, marketing data, and things to know within the industry.

    Loading...