Amoeba Music owner says landmarking effort by nonprofits is ploy to prevent resi development

Two nonprofits organizations have filed a lawsuit to stop plans to raze and redevelop the iconic store into a multifamily building

Los Angeles /
Aug.August 16, 2019 03:01 PM
AIDS Healthcare Foundation CEO Michael Weinstein and the Amoeba Music store (Credit: Getty Images and Wikipedia)
AIDS Healthcare Foundation CEO Michael Weinstein and the Amoeba Music store (Credit: Getty Images and Wikipedia)

Two nonprofits have launched a full-fledged effort — lawsuit included — to save the iconic Amoeba Music store on Sunset Boulevard from the wrecking ball,  where it would be replaced by a residential high-rise. But unusually, the party that could stand to benefit if the effort is successful is not happy.

The owners of Amoeba Music in Hollywood have spoken out against Coalition 2 Preserve LA and AIDS Healthcare Foundation, which filed a join lawsuit in July to stop GPI Companies from bulldozing the store and building the luxury apartment building.

Their efforts, said co-owner Jim Henderson, have hurt Amoeba’s relocation plans and could ultimately cause them to shutter their doors, according to Curbed.

“Amoeba does not support the Coalition’s lawsuit and finds it counter-productive,” Henderson said in a statement Friday. “The Coalition to Preserve LA has overstepped its bounds in using Amoeba as a pawn in its game and now threatens the very existence of the business it is claiming to hope to preserve.”

Amoeba sold the property to GPI for $34 million in 2015, with the intent that it would relocate in another Hollywood location nearby. But landlords who have been witnessing the drastic efforts to preserve the store are now put off by Amoeba, scared that the same situation could happen to them if they choose to rent space to them.

Michael Weinstein, the vocal leader of AHF, responded by saying they are not “using Amoeba,” but rather “fighting for the integrity of our community and to preserve what makes it interesting.” [Curbed] — Natalie Hoberman


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