Mike Barry adds apartments to seven-story hotel in Koreatown

New plan would stack retail, 60 guest rooms and 20 residential units under one roof

<p>A photo illustration depicting a rendering of the planned seven-story building at the corner of 8th and Mariposa in Koreatown (Getty, EWAI)</p>

A photo illustration depicting a rendering of the planned seven-story building at the corner of 8th and Mariposa in Koreatown (Getty, EWAI)

A Koreatown property owner has tweaked plans for a six-story hotel to include an extra floor and 20 apartments. 

EWAI, an architecture firm based in Koreatown, has filed revised plans on behalf of owner Mike Barry to build a seven-story, 60-room hotel with 20 apartments at 3216-3222 West 8th Street and 800-814 ½ Mariposa Avenue, Urbanize Los Angeles reported.

It would replace a four-unit apartment complex and parking lot.

Barry’s initial plans, filed in 2018, called for a hotel and residential project. In 2022, he revised his plans to feature a six-story, 95-room hotel. He’s now reverted to his original proposal.

Plans now call for a seven-story building with a 60-room hotel, with 20 apartments above 4,000 square feet of shops and restaurants. A three-level underground parking garage would serve 71 cars.

The U-shaped project, designed by EWAI, would include separate hotel and residential wings, with swimming pools at the second floor and rooftop. The hotel would include a 1,400-square-foot rooftop bar.

The proposed hotel and apartment building has mostly floor-to-ceiling windows, and is trimmed in white, gray and slate blue, according to a rendering.

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Pending approvals and a zone change, the developer would break ground late this year and complete the hotel/apartment project in 2026.

Mike Barry owns the H Hotel at 3206 W 8th Street in Koreatown, adjacent to the proposed 60-room hotel and apartments.

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Last year, an investigative report by ProPublica accused Barry and other Los Angeles hotel owners of illegally turning residential hotels for low-income residents into boutique hotels for tourists, charging more than $200 a night. 

A hotel manager said the hotel hadn’t accepted long-term residents since 2019, and asked the city to remove its residential designation.

— Dana Bartholomew