Trump CFO Allen Weisselberg quit roles even before indictment

Executive at ex-president’s firm faces charges of tax fraud and grand larceny

National /
Jul.July 14, 2021 04:05 PM
Trump CFO Allen Weisselberg (Getty)

Trump CFO Allen Weisselberg (Getty)

Trump Organization CFO Allen Weisselberg began to shed his company titles just before he was indicted, new documents show.

Weisselberg began resigning from his dozens of positions in late June, part of a plan to quit every Trump Organization subsidiary where he held a role. Weisselberg wrote a resignation letter on June 25, six days before surrendering to authorities, according to documents obtained by The Washington Post.

A list of positions Weisselberg was resigning from was largely redacted, but the publication reported he has left at least 54 Trump entities. One person familiar with the organization told the newspaper that Weisselberg no longer has any titles in the Trump Organization.

Weisselberg didn’t cite a reason for his resignations, but likely aimed to avoid rattling regulators and lenders. His lawyers had been attempting to stop prosecutors from pressing charges.

On July 1, Weisselberg was indicted on felony charges. He is facing 15 felony counts, including charges of tax fraud and grand larceny.

Prosecutors allege Weisselberg was part of a scheme in which the Trump Organization provided executives lavish benefits, including free rent and tuition, as a form of untaxed compensation. Donald Trump was not indicted, although his firm was.

Weisselberg has pleaded not guilty and has yet to cooperate with investigators.

[WaPo] — Holden Walter-Warner






    Related Articles

    arrow_forward_ios
    Ministerial Privilege: Would Tony Blair’s transfer tax loophole work in the U.S.?
    Ministerial Privilege: Would Tony Blair’s transfer tax loophole work in the U.S.?
    Ministerial Privilege: Would Tony Blair’s transfer tax loophole work in the U.S.?
    President Joe Biden and NAR president Charlie Oppler (Getty, NAR)
    Biden’s new eviction moratorium immediately challenged in court
    Biden’s new eviction moratorium immediately challenged in court
    The effective rate was 1.1 percent, on average, in 2020, down from 1.14 percent in 2019. (iStock)
    Homeowners’ property taxes grew twice as fast last year
    Homeowners’ property taxes grew twice as fast last year
    Allen Weisselberg and Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance (Getty)
    Feds subpoena Trump CFO’s personal bank records
    Feds subpoena Trump CFO’s personal bank records
    Sen. Tim Kaine, Amy Klobuchar and Rob Portman (Getty)
    Federal bill would give $1.5B to pro-housing localities
    Federal bill would give $1.5B to pro-housing localities
    President Biden signing the $1.9 trillion COVID relief bill on March 11. (Getty)
    Done deal: Biden signs $1.9T stimulus with billions for real estate
    Done deal: Biden signs $1.9T stimulus with billions for real estate
    U.S. District Judge John Campbell Barker, who was appointed by former President Donald Trump, ruled the eviction moratorium to be unconstitutional. (Getty, Texas Attorney General)
    National eviction moratorium ruled unconstitutional, but remains in place
    National eviction moratorium ruled unconstitutional, but remains in place
    Jenna Ryan (Twitter.com/DotJenna)
    Broker who stormed Capitol apologizes as she is charged
    Broker who stormed Capitol apologizes as she is charged
    arrow_forward_ios

    The Deal's newsletters give you the latest scoops, fresh headlines, marketing data, and things to know within the industry.

    Loading...