Irving City Council to consider 22-acre office-to-resi conversion

Rezoning application would convert part of Fluor Enterprises’ HQ into a single family neighborhood

A photo illustration of 6700 Las Colinas Boulevard (LoopNet, Getty Images)
A photo illustration of 6700 Las Colinas Boulevard (LoopNet, Getty Images)

Fluor Enterprises, a subsidiary of the Fluor Corporation, has put forward a rezoning request to convert some of its office holdings in Las Colinas into residential space, but the proposal seems likely to be rejected at the Irving City Council’s Sept. 1 meeting.

The land — more than 22 acres — is actually part of the company’s headquarters grounds at 6700 Las Colinas Boulevard. The Dallas Business Journal reported that the Irving City Council will be reviewing a request to turn this business district to a single-family residential neighborhood.

Alexander Hunt Distinctive Homes, a custom home builder based in Dallas, is attached to the development project as an applicant, while Fluor is listed as the owner. The proposed homes would be “C-shaped” to allow room for a courtyard on the side yard, according to the city council’s agenda.

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The two proposed ordinances — one rezoning the area from business to residential, and another seeking variances to make single-family development possible — are slated to be considered by the City Council at its Thursday meeting. Though they were already approved by the Planning & Zoning Commission in unanimous votes, council staff noted the lack of proximity to existing residential areas and the potential to “erode the amount of available commercial tracts left for development in the city,” and recommended that the council deny them both.

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— Maddy Sperling