KDC plans $200M Uptown Dallas office tower

Project will rise across from Klyde Warren Park

KDC's Steve Van Amburgh and a rendering of the planned tower at 1919 Woodall Rodgers Freeway in Uptown Dallas (Getty, KDC)
KDC's Steve Van Amburgh and a rendering of the planned tower at 1919 Woodall Rodgers Freeway in Uptown Dallas (Getty, KDC)

A local developer’s plans to build a high-rise tower in Uptown Dallas will cost at least $200 million.

Dallas-based KDC is set to start construction in May on the 30-story Parkside Uptown at 1919 Woodall Rodgers Freeway, and complete the project by 2026, the Dallas Business Journal reported. The first phase of construction, 113,000 out of 493,000 square feet, carries the $200 million price tag.

Plans developed by KDC and site owner Miyama USA call for a 30-story office tower with ground-floor retail and restaurants.

New York-based architectural firm Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates, is designing part of the building’s facade as an extension of the green space of Klyde Warren Park below, offering a corner plaza with shade from the harsh Texas sun provided by the cantilevered tower.

The project’s location at the corner of Woodall Rodgers Freeway and North Harwood Street, is down the street from the free M Trolley that connects to the DART light rail and the rest of Uptown.

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“Just outside the front door is the incredible urban oasis of Klyde Warren Park, featuring gourmet food trucks, café-style seating, and plenty of room to relax and play,” the project website reads.

The property will include a sky lobby, outdoor terrace and fitness center for office tenants.

KDC is working on multiple other projects in the area, including the Wells Fargo corporate campus in Irving, which includes two 400,000-square-foot buildings that can accommodate up to 4,000 workers. The firm is also planning a Central Market-anchored highrise development at McKinney and Lemmon in Uptown. That $95 million project includes a 25-story tower with offices and multifamily.

— Victoria Pruitt