The Heights co-developer moves on to the East End

Another one of Houston’s old industrial districts is getting an adaptive reuse makeover

Triten's Scott Arnoldy and rendering of 2315 Navigation Boulevard (Triten Real Estate Partners, Michael Hsu Office of Architecture, Getty Images)
Triten's Scott Arnoldy and rendering of 2315 Navigation Boulevard (Triten Real Estate Partners, Michael Hsu Office of Architecture, Getty Images)

The gentrification of Houston’s East End is in full swing.

The latest change to the neighborhood is The Mill, a six-acre mixed-use project. Triten Real Estate Partners mast plan will reshape the area east of downtown, according to the Houston Chronicle.

The nearly 840,000 square-foot development is going up where Canal Street and Navigation Boulevard intersect, which is considered to be Houston’s gateway into the East End, according to the area’s economic development management organization East End District. The Loopnet listing for 2315 Navigation Boulevard — last updated in 2011 — describes the site as undergoing, “revitalization with new residential development, including multi-family, lofts and townhomes.”

The Houston-based firm began the first phase of construction, which includes 341 market-rate apartments, 6,036 square-feet of retail and the total conversion of a decaying brick building on the block.

Triten CEO Scott Arnoldy told the Houston Chronicle that the project will not only repurpose the existing structure but also preserve some of its history, while revitalizing the area with modern features.

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The designer, Michael Hsu’s Office of Architecture, is well-known for its adaptive reuse of industrial warehouses in the Bayou City. Its plans for the site will include two retail buildings that will feature saw-tooth designs atop as a nod to its roots as an 1890s lumber mill.

Adaptive reuse development projects have gained popularity in Houston due to the city’s industrial past. The East End is currently the target of Concept Neighborhood, which has plans to convert a four-acre warehouse complex into what’s being referred to as “Brooklyn in the South.”

Triten’s previous work includes co-developing The Heights with Radom Capital. Last year, Radom converted an 1894 Houston clock tower — one of the city’s oldest buildings — into a modern office space.

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