Editor's note: “Not in my back yard”

Mar.March 03, 2020 01:00 PM

Heidi Patalano

The Winter 2020 edition of The Real Deal’s Tristate issue is live for subscribers! Below, Special Issues Editor Heidi Patalano gives you a look at what’s inside the issue:
From the hamlets of Long Island to the sprawling suburbs of Los Angeles, there’s a problem so pervasive it’s got its own acronym, recognized by anyone who’s ever put a project plan in front of a community board for approval. NIMBYism, or “not in my backyard,” is shorthand for community resistance to projects, often those that would bring greater density — and new residents of color. Worries about overcrowded schools and untenable traffic dominate NIMBY arguments against these projects, which often include supportive or affordable housing components. But there’s something unsaid within their protests.
They say that this is going to raise our taxes, make our schools crowded. But if this is a community that is mostly white, they’re really saying, ‘Well, we really don’t want black or brown people,’” said Elaine Gross, who runs regional civil rights group ERASE Racism based in Long Island.

While the Obama administration put laws in place to make it harder for the NIMBYs to win out, the Trump administration, deeming the laws ineffective, are in the midst of dismantling them. How will this shape development in the tri-state area going forward? TRD reporters Georgia Kromrei and Sylvia Varnham O’Regan investigate.

Elsewhere in the issue, senior reporter E.B. Solomont takes a look at how resi juggernaut Compass has fared with its national expansion efforts. Years ago, the company hoped to have 20 percent market share of 20 major U.S. markets by 2020. Expectations have since been revised, and some progress has been made, as is evidenced by the top broker team in our annual ranking of Westchester brokers and brokerages: Heather Harrison’s 15-person team at Compass’ Rye office, which closed $54.1 million over the period analyzed for the ranking. 

Other highlights include our look at the priciest Hamptons property sales of 2019 and staffer Eddie Small’s look at why everybody wants to be an industrial sales broker these days. It’s all about that cash money, natch.

Enjoy the issue!


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