Brooklyn, Harlem community boards reject controversial rezoning plans

EDC hints at changes to Bedford-Union Armory project

New York /
Jun.June 29, 2017 09:00 AM

Community boards in Harlem and Crown Heights rejected two controversial rezoning proposals amid anxiety over rising rents and displacement.

In a Tuesday night vote, members of Community Board 9 voted not to support the plan to convert the Bedford-Union Armory into condominiums. Dozens of activists attended the meeting holding signs reading “BFC = Gentrification” in reference to developer BFC Partners TRData LogoTINY and cheered the result.

The board merely has an advisory role and the project’s fate rests on the de Blasio administration and the City Council. The project would include 330 rental apartments, some of them below-market, 58 condos and a 35,000-square-foot recreation center.

Local council member Laurie Cumbo opposes the project in its current form.

“We have certainly heard from the community throughout this process that the condos are a significant sticking point,” Lydia Downing of the New York City Economic Development Corporation said. “So what we’re trying to do now is negotiate with BFC to understand, is there a way to remove the condos and still have a financially feasible project?”

Meanwhile in East Harlem, Community Board 11 voted unanimously not to support a rezoning of the neighborhood that would allow new buildings to rise up to 35 stories tall, unless certain conditions were met.  The decision irked neighborhood activists, who had hoped the board would reject any rezoning in principle, holding up signs reading “no to racist rezoning.” [DNAinfo] and [DNAinfo]Konrad Putzier


Related Articles

arrow_forward_ios
1591 Alps Road in Wayne, NJ and March Associates Construction president Louis March (Google Maps, Getty, March Associates)
From funeral home to strip mall
From funeral home to strip mall
 SL Green’s Marc Holliday with 450 Park Avenue  (Taconic Partners, SL Green)
TRD Pro: Here are NYC’s biggest offices sales of Q2
TRD Pro: Here are NYC’s biggest offices sales of Q2
From left: Jeff Goldberg, CEO of Fairstead, and Will Blodgett, Founder of Tredway (Getty Images, Fairstead)
Fairstead fires back, alleges Blodgett threatened to go “torched earth”
Fairstead fires back, alleges Blodgett threatened to go “torched earth”
From left: Extell's Gary Barnett and JDS Development’s Michael Stern along with One Manhattan Square, The Narrows, and 111 West 57th Street (Extell, JDS Development, Getty Images, The Narrows Condo)
New development sales plummeted 30% in July
New development sales plummeted 30% in July
Queens official Donovan Richards, Larry Silverstein and rendering of Innovation QNS (Queens Borough President, Innovation QNS, Getty)
Queens boro prez turns on industry, rejects Silverstein’s $2B project
Queens boro prez turns on industry, rejects Silverstein’s $2B project
Tavros Capital’s Nicholas Silvers and Charney Companies’ Sam Charney in front of 24-05 thru 24-19 Jackson Avenue in Long Island City (Getty Images, Tavros Capital, Charney Companies, Google Maps)
Tavros, Charney plan 55-story rental on long-stalled site
Tavros, Charney plan 55-story rental on long-stalled site
3100-3124 Atlantic Avenue in East New York, Brooklyn (Google Maps, Getty)
Locals fear homeless shelter king will gentrify East New York
Locals fear homeless shelter king will gentrify East New York
Adam Piore with the Time Warner Center, 15 Central Park West, One57, Sheffield57, and Hudson Yards (Getty, CityRealty, Pablo Costa Tirado, CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons)
“New Kings of New York” author on 5 projects that reshaped NYC real estate
“New Kings of New York” author on 5 projects that reshaped NYC real estate
arrow_forward_ios

The Deal's newsletters give you the latest scoops, fresh headlines, marketing data, and things to know within the industry.

Loading...