Could rainy day renderings work?

One Brooklyn development is putting the question to the test

TRD WEEKEND EDITION /
Dec.December 10, 2017 02:01 PM

(Credits back to front: Max Pixel; Dave Fayram/Flickr)

A rainy (or snowy) day is expected in New York real estate, but not in picture-perfect renderings. When New York YIMBY published a stormy rendering of IMC Architecture’s new building in East Flatbush last week, anyone attuned to real estate did a double take.

It’s a refreshing, or perhaps drenching, reminder that in a world of perfect sunny days a dose of realism (regardless of its form) catches the eye. “It would do the public some good to be always a little skeptical of a rendering… maybe squint their eyes and imagine a rainy day, or question whether the entire promise of the architecture is going to be delivered,” Kushner told The Real Deal on the calculus architects weigh as they try to render their unrealized structures into marketable images. As for the 10-unit building at 679 Lefferts Avenue, whether its rainy rendering attracts the attention of tenants remains to be seen. — E.K. Hudson


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