Law firm Perkins Coie takes 60K sf at Durst’s 1155 Sixth

High-growth law firm is expanding in move from Rockefeller Center

TRD New York /
Jun.June 28, 2018 12:16 PM

Douglas Durst and 1155 Sixth Avenue (Credit: Studios Architecture)

UPDATED, June 29, 10:26 a.m.: International law firm Perkins Coie, which has been in growth mode since opening its New York City office seven years ago, is expanding and relocating on Sixth Avenue.

The Seattle, Washington-based legal shop signed a lease for shy of 60,000 square feet at the Durst Organization’s 1155 Sixth Avenue, sources told The Real Deal.

Perkins Coie will be relocating from nearby at 30 Rockefeller Plaza, where it’s been growing by taking short-term sublease space from other law firms since planting its flag in New York City in 2011.

The company will be expanding from its current footprint of about 38,000 square feet with the new lease, which has a term of 15 years. The asking rent for the space was in the area of $80s per square foot.

Representatives for the Durst Organization and Perkins Coie could not be immediately reached for comment. A CBRE team of Ken Rapp, David Kleinhandler, Michael Wellen and Cara Chayet represented Perkins Coie in the negotiations. The brokers declined to comment.

Perkins Coie is taking three and a half floors in Durst’s 790,000-square-foot tower that were left empty when the law firm White & Case relocated nearby to the Rockefeller Group’s 1221 Sixth Avenue.

Durst has spent $110 million renovating the building, including a new lobby, a rooftop pavilion and new floor-to-ceiling windows on the tower’s chamfered corners.

Financial services company Deutsche Börse also signed a 10-year lease in the building for a little more than 12,000 square feet in a relocation from 60 Broad Street. Simon Landmann of JLL represented Deutsche Börse.

Durst’s Tom Bow and Rocco Romeo represented the landlord in-house in both leases. The company’s Tanya Grimaldo also worked on the Deutsche Börse deal.


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