WeWork goes vegetarian refusing to pay for meat under new company policy

Co-founder Miguel McKelvey broke the news to 6,000 staff by email this week

New York Weekend Edition /
Jul.July 14, 2018 10:54 AM

This is not a drill: WeWork–and anyone eating on the company’s dime–is going vegetarian.

The co-working giant valued at about $20 billion is removing all meat options from its internal menu and telling employees to leave any meals with meat off their expense reports because they will no longer be footing the bill, according to Bloomberg.

Co-founder Miguel McKelvey informed WeWork’s 6,000 staff of their new diet by email this week and announced the policy would be in effect at the company’s upcoming internal summer retreat.

In the message, McKelvey explained the reason behind the new policy: “New research indicates that avoiding meat is one of the biggest things an individual can do to reduce their personal environmental impact, even more than switching to a hybrid car,” he wrote.

The meat-free policy extends to any company travel and expenses, any WeWork events and the company’s internal food kiosks that are installed in its 400 properties worldwide.

Anyone who protests for “medical or religious” reasons was directed to speak with WeWork’s policy team about their options.

The carnal ban comes as the company has recently launched an internal campaign to reduce the use of plastic and prevent wastage of leftover food from company events. [Bloomberg]Erin Hudson


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