Millennials would rather buy real estate from an influencer than an agent

Study found 80 percent of millennials would consider hiring an influencer as an agent

TRD NATIONAL /
Nov.November 03, 2018 11:00 AM

(Credit: Pixabay)

If you’re trying to help a millennial with real estate, you might be better off being an influencer than an agent.

A recent Engel & Völkers study found that 80 percent of millennials would consider hiring an influencer as a real estate agent, according to Inman. The study surveyed more than 1,000 people born between 1982 and 1999 with annual incomes of more than $100,000. The top three factors for the participants when choosing a real estate agent were referrals, local reputation and neighborhood expertise.

But, agents “have to have a niche or distinguishing factor that blends this knowledge with entertainment or aspirational value that will make you a center of influence — building your following and referral base as a result,” explained Engel & Völkers Americas President and CEO Anthony Hitt, speaking to Inman.

The study also found that 98 percent of respondents refer to social media or online reviews when contemplating a purchase and 84 percent said influencers “impacted their decision.” [Inman] – Eddie Small


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