State to develop wind turbine plant on Brooklyn waterfront

Climate activists had pushed plan for South Brooklyn Marine Terminal

New York /
Jan.January 21, 2021 09:00 AM
The South Brooklyn Marine Terminal (Google Maps; Waterfront Alliance)

The South Brooklyn Marine Terminal (Google Maps; Waterfront Alliance)

The South Brooklyn Marine Terminal is set to be transformed into a hub for renewable energy.

The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority last week announced a partnership with Norwegian energy company Equinor to turn the site into a wind turbine manufacturing space, a project that will be completed in 2025, City & State reported.

The Sunset Park project represents the largest procurement of renewable energy by any state government, and comes after the collapse of Industry City’s controversial rezoning.

The waterfront terminal, between 29th and 36th streets, is operated under a lease by both Industry City and the Red Hook Container Terminal, and includes 73 acres of unused space. The main tenant is a recycling plant operator, Sims Metal Management.

Under the plan, NYSERDA will invest $200 million in the terminal, and Equinor, partnered with BP, will invest the same amount.

“One of the obstacles to developing offshore wind in the U.S. is, there haven’t been these types of manufacturing facilities available,” Nilda Mesa, adjunct professor at the Columbia University School of International and Public Affairs, told City & State. “And so to develop one here bodes well for the future.”

The facility will complement a plan backed by the Cuomo administration for a huge offshore wind farm near the Hamptons.

Waterfront advocates have been calling for the marine terminal to be a wind power infrastructure hub for at least three years.

The plan has been hailed as a win by local activists, including one who said the Industry City rezoning would gentrify Sunset Park.

“This is an example that another world really is possible,” said Elizabeth Yeampierre of advocacy group Uprose. “New York City is going to position itself as a leader on climate justice.” [City and State] — Sylvia Varnham O’Regan





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