Divisive housing bill dies quick death in first State Senate committee hearing

Sen. Scott Wiener vows to return next year with revised proposal to promote transit-adjacent housing

Los Angeles /
Apr.April 18, 2018 09:30 AM
State Senator Scott Wiener and a Metro train

So much for that.

After months of debate, a sweeping bill to allow dense housing to be built near transit met a swift end in Sacramento on Tuesday.

The State Senate’s Transportation and Housing Committee voted down Senate Bill 827 in the divisive measure’s very first committee hearing, Curbed reported. The goal of the bill was to alleviate the housing shortage and promote affordability across the state, particularly in expensive cities like Los Angeles and San Francisco.

Following the hearing, the bill’s author, State Sen. Scott Wiener (D-San Francisco), said he would revise the measure and “develop a strong proposal for next year.”

“I have always known there was a real possibility that SB 827 — like other difficult and impactful bills that have come before — was going to take more than one year,” he said in a statement.

The bill has been a topic of heated debate around the state since Wiener first proposed it in January, and he softened the proposal earlier this month amid strong criticism from opponents.

Late last month, the Los Angeles City Council claimed SB 827 would strip the city of its mandate to decide its own zoning. And Mayor Garcetti said the proposal didn’t do enough to protect affordable housing and would negatively impact the city’s less dense neighborhoods.

In the watered-down version of the bill, the maximum height for residential buildings allowed near transit was reduced from eight stories to five, more protections for affordable housing were incorporated and its effective date was pushed back from 2019 to 2021. Some accused Wiener of “neutering” the bill, according to Curbed.

The law would have impacted urban centers like Los Angeles most heavily. Entire neighborhoods with ample transit like Koreatown and South L.A. would undergo a sweeping zoning change, and an L.A. Times analysis found that 190,000 parcels across the city would be impacted.

Proponents say the bill would have also created a strong supply of new homes, which would drive down the price of existing housing.

It’s not the only bill Wiener has on deck. His proposed SB 828 bill would expand a 50-year-old law to require local municipalities to zone twice as much land for apartments and condos for very low- and low-income Californians. [Curbed] — Dennis Lynch


Related Articles

arrow_forward_ios
Deborah La Franchi and render of 10400 S. San Pedro (Tim Berger c/o SDS Capital, Getty)
Private equity takes on the supporting housing sector
Private equity takes on the supporting housing sector
Jose Huizar (Getty)
Former LA city councilman José Huizar to plead guilty to bribery and tax evasion
Former LA city councilman José Huizar to plead guilty to bribery and tax evasion
Habitat for Humanity OC president Monique Davis and 1921 West Washington Avenue (Habitat for Humanity, Google Maps)
Habitat for Humanity to build duplexes in Santa Ana
Habitat for Humanity to build duplexes in Santa Ana
CAA's Thomas K. Bannon with Pasadena (CAA, Getty)
Court to hear challenge to Pasadena rent control measure
Court to hear challenge to Pasadena rent control measure
From left: Lexington Apartments, 1221 Ocean, Thea at Metropolis, and Vue Los Feliz
$500M sale tops list of LA multifamily deals in 2022
$500M sale tops list of LA multifamily deals in 2022
Beach City Capital's Jason Muller with rendering of 12763 Mitchell Avenue (Beach City Capital)
Beach City Capital to start work on Mar Vista apartments
Beach City Capital to start work on Mar Vista apartments
Skanska USA's Clare De Briere and renderings of the project at 8633 Wilshire Boulevard in Beverly Hills (LinkedIn, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill)
Skanska USA redesigns office building in Beverly Hills
Skanska USA redesigns office building in Beverly Hills
(Photo Illustration by Steven Dilakian for The Real Deal with Getty)
California’s growth proposition called into question again
California’s growth proposition called into question again
arrow_forward_ios

The Deal's newsletters give you the latest scoops, fresh headlines, marketing data, and things to know within the industry.

Loading...