South Florida by the numbers: Hot town, summer in the city

Miami /
Aug.August 23, 2017 02:15 PM

“South Florida by the numbers” is a web feature that catalogs the most notable, quirky and surprising real estate statistics.

BREAKING NEWS: It is really, really hot outside. We know, this is not terribly shocking information for readers familiar with South Florida, maps, and/or how the seasons work, but for many new residents and visitors, this degree (no pun intended!) of summer takes some getting used to. This month’s solar eclipse got us thinking even more about the sun, inspiring us to look at how Miami’s sizzling temperatures and its always fascinating real estate market cross paths. So, until it cools off a bit, grab your sunscreen and enjoy this month’s edition of South Florida by the numbers.

40: Years of Miami weather records that can be considered reliable (according to the National Weather Service), refuting headlines announcing that July 2017 was Miami’s hottest month since 1895. The location of weather recording devices is a major issue here, with many believing that recent spikes in temperature readings can be attributed to the current location at Miami International Airport, where years of construction on the Dolphin and Palmetto Expressways have amplified reported temperatures. [TheNextMiami]

#1: Miami-Dade County’s current “Trulia popularity” (ranking online search interest) on Trulia’s popular Heat Map real estate website, among Florida counties, followed by Polk and Broward. [Trulia]

Six times: Between 2011 and 2015, the higher rate of sea level rise in the Southeastern United States versus the rate of global increase, according to the University of Florida. Researchers have dubbed Miami Beach a “hot spot” of these rising sea levels, where even “sunny day flooding” can occur during high tide. [TheRealDeal]

$5.25 million: Asking price for Miami Heat guard Tyler Johnson’s Pinecrest estate, which was put on the market earlier this year. Johnson purchased the 12,000 square-foot home for $4.82 million last summer. [Sun-Sentinel]

76: Percentage of South Florida adults who believe global warming is happening, according to the Yale Climate Opinion Maps — six points higher than the U.S. average. More than half in South Florida (54 percent) think global warming is already harming people in the United States — also six percentage points higher than the national average. This difference indicates our region’s heightened awareness of climate change, which this article contends is the basis for a new Miami gentrification cycle; wherein higher ground becomes the more desirable property. [ScientificAmerican]

This column is produced by the Master Brokers Forum, a network of South Florida’s elite real estate professionals where membership is by invitation only and based on outstanding production, as well as ethical and professional behavior.


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