The Real Deal New York

Posts Tagged ‘housing discrimination’

  • Donald Trump and Ben Carson

    Donald Trump and Ben Carson

    With a president now in the White House who was once sued by the Justice Department for racial discrimination in housing, advocates for fair housing are worried rollbacks are coming. [more]

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  • Preet Bharara and Jamie Dimon (Credit: Getty Images)

    JPMorgan Chase agreed to pay $55 million to settle charges that independent mortgage brokers working with the bank discriminated against minorities.

    In a complaint filed Wednesday, U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York Preet Bharara alleged that the brokers charged black and hispanic borrowers higher rates than their white peers between 2006 and 2009. The complaint alleged that the bank “could have, but failed, to better monitor its wholesale brokers to discourage discrimination.” [more]

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  • River Park Residences in the Bronx and Mo Vaughn (Credit: Reliant Realty Services and Getty Images)

    Former Mets slugger Mo Vaughn is one of five landlords charged by the city’s Human Rights Commission with discriminating against tenants on federal assistance programs. [more]

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  • 2-04324-0001.zqktkzw8

    2126 Muliner Avenue in Bronxdale, one of Hamdi Nezaj’s buildings

    The Fair Housing Justice Center is suing Bronx landlord Hamdi Nezaj, accusing him of discriminating among potential tenants on the basis of race and source of income. Nezaj told The Real Deal he is innocent of the charges.

    The Financial District-based nonprofit claims to have sent several undercover workers, called “testers,” of various racial backgrounds and with various claimed sources of income to one of Nezaj’s rental offices. [more]

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  • 451 11th Street in Park Slope

    451 11th Street in Park Slope

    Park Slope has become so synonymous with baby strollers that actor Patrick Stewart half-jokingly tried to start a ban in 2014. The son-in-law of a landlord was already onboard, telling a prospective renter with a pregnant wife that there would be “no babies” in the building, setting off a housing discrimination complaint.

    As the story goes, Adam DiLeo went to Mohamed Shahbain’s three-story building at 451 11th Street between Sixth and Seventh avenues to look at an apartment. Shahbain’s son-in-law answered the door and told DiLeo, “No, no babies” after learning DiLeo’s wife was pregnant.

    DiLeo, a lawyer, filed a housing discrimination complaint on the grounds that the city’s human rights law prohibits landlords from refusing tenants because they have children. [more]

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  • On Sunday, Gov. Cuomo announced the launch of a statewide initiative to crack down on discrimination in the housing market. [more]

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  • From left: Beleaguered landlord Yeshaya Wasserman's 652-668 Brooklyn Avenue and 651-667 Brooklyn Avenue

    From left: 652-668 Brooklyn Avenue and 651-667 Brooklyn Avenue in Brooklyn

    New York state’s Tenant Protection Unit has reached a settlement with Brooklyn landlord Yeshaya Wasserman, who was accused of harassing tenants and violating their rights. [more]

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  • Stonehenge Village at 135 West 96th Street

    Stonehenge Village at 135 West 96th Street

    Tenants of an Upper West Side mixed-income building allege the landlord is discriminating against the elderly by barring low-income residents from using the property’s on-site gym.

    The battle broke out earlier this year after Stonehenge Partners reserved the gym at Stonehenge Village at 135 West 96th Street strictly for market-rate tenants. In an update to an earlier complaint cited by DNAinfo, 74-year-old tenant association president Jean Dorsey said 66 percent of rent-regulated residents at Stonehenge Village are 65 or older, while just 5 percent of wealthier tenants fall in that demographic. [more]

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  • New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman

    New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman

    Three New York City brokerages agreed to pay penalties and change their policies to settle an investigation by the New York attorney general’s office into their alleged rejection of clients and applicants who receive government assistance.

    New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman announced the settlement today with Absolute Properties, Brownstone Real Estate and Destination Real Estate. [more]

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  • Tudor City

    Tudor City

    WEEKENDEDITION A Tudor City resident is suing the apartment building for trying to kick out his girlfriend because she is mentally ill. [more]

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  • housingTOP

    A new lawsuit charges the owners of two Brooklyn rental complexes with pushing out black tenants in an effort to bring in white residents.

    According to the suit, filed by tenants at complexes on Brooklyn Avenue and Hawthorne Street in East Flatbush, landlords Yeshaya Wasserman, Shay Wasserman and Yitzchok Rambod have ignored repair requests, offered cash buyouts and forced evictions since purchasing the buildings in 2009. White tenants who do not live in rent-controlled units, meanwhile, are not subjected to the same treatment, the plaintiffs allege. [more]

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  • lucas-ferrara

    Lucas Ferrara

    A class-action lawsuit filed yesterday alleges that the city’s property-tax system discriminates against African-American and Hispanics who live in rental properties.

    Those New Yorkers pay higher taxes — due to high rates on rental properties — than condominiums, co-ops and single-family homes that are largely owned by white and/or Asian people, the suit said. The suit claims the $20 billion, 33-year-old system is unconstitutional and violates the anti-discrimination provisions of the Federal Fair Housing Act. Hispanics and African-Americans jointly comprise more than half of all renters, but occupy roughly 32 percent of single-family homes, 27 percent co-ops and 20 percent of condos. [more]

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  • From left: 475 FDR Drive

    From left: Cove Club in Battery City Park, East River Housing Corporation at 475 FDR Drive

    A second lawsuit has been filed against a co-op for barring tenants from keeping emotional support dogs in their apartments.

    Three tenants of East River Housing Corporation at 475 FDR Drive claim that banning their emotional support dogs from the apartment building was a violation of the Fair Housing Act and a form of disability discrimination, according to a suit recently filed in federal court. [more]

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  • This month in real estate history

    August 14, 2013 04:30PM By Adam Pincus
    Henry Cabot Lodge

    Henry Cabot Lodge

    From the August issue: 1961: UN African delegates complain of housing bias

    United Nations delegates from Africa formally complained they had been discriminated against in their search for housing in Manhattan, 52 years ago this month.

    The delegates wrote a letter to Secretary-General Dag Hammarskjold outlining a range of bias that they had encountered. A traffic stop is what prompted the members to send the dispatch, but apartment hunting was one of the biggest injustices they cited. [more]

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  • Wells Fargo Bank will have to fork out $175 million for allegedly engaging in discriminatory lending practices from 2004 through 2009, following a Justice Department announcement, Crain’s reported. The country’s largest residential mortgage lender is accused of a pattern of prejudicial practices that forced 34,000 African-American and Hispanic borrowers across 36 states and the District of Columbia to pay higher rates for loans simply because of their race, according to Deputy Attorney General James Cole. [more]

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  • New York-based landlord Friedland Properties is in settlement negotiations with the federal government for allegedly failing to comply with housing discrimination laws that protect the disabled, the Wall Street Journal reported. The building in question is the 22-story, 143-unit Melar, a rental building at 250 West 93rd Street on the Upper West Side, which the U.S. Attorney’s office believes Friedland did not make accessible enough for wheelchair users. Friedland initially agreed to set aside $180,000 to cover discrimination claims, pay a $40,000 fine and spend $288,300 to remedy the situation. But in April, the landlord filed a motion seeking to withdraw from the settlement. The implications of the ruling could extend far beyond the Melar and affect some 176,000 apartments — including 64,000 affordable housing units — throughout the city, industry insiders told the Journal. … [more]

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  • New Yorkers who receive public rental subsidies filed 125 housing discrimination complaints last year, up 45 percent from the number of complaints filed in 2008, according to the Wall Street Journal. The numbers were revealed at a hearing yesterday by the city’s Human Rights Commission, during which City Council members said they were frustrated that recent efforts to stop landlords from rejecting low-income tenants had been in vain. In January 2008, the City Council voted to ban housing discrimination based on a tenant’s source of income. Mayor Michael Bloomberg vetoed the legislation, but it was overridden, and the law took effect that March. Since then, the Human Rights Commission said it received 260 calls from hopeful tenants who claimed their vouchers were refused by landlords; 214 of those cases were filed officially. Of those 214 cases, 108 were resolved in the tenants’ favor, 42 are pending review, 55 were closed because the complainants didn’t have enough evidence and nine were dismissed. [WSJ]

    [more]

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  • New Yorkers who receive public rental subsidies filed 125 housing discrimination complaints last year, up 45 percent from the number of complaints filed in 2008, according to the Wall Street Journal. The numbers were revealed at a hearing yesterday by the city’s Human Rights Commission, during which City Council members said they were frustrated that recent efforts to stop landlords from rejecting low-income tenants had been in vain. In January 2008, the City Council voted to ban housing discrimination based on a tenant’s source of income. Mayor Michael Bloomberg vetoed the legislation, but it was overridden, and the law took effect that March. Since then, the Human Rights Commission said it received 260 calls from hopeful tenants who claimed their vouchers were refused by landlords; 214 of those cases were filed officially. Of those 214 cases, 108 were resolved in the tenants’ favor, 42 are pending review, 55 were closed because the complainants didn’t have enough evidence and nine were dismissed. [WSJ]

    [more]

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  • Housing discrimination continues in New York City, even 40 years after the federal Fair Housing Act was passed, according to the Fair Housing Justice Center, a New York City-based fair housing non-profit organization. The center’s executive director, Diane Houk, said city officials have not done enough to monitor compliance with fair housing laws in Internet advertisements. Since 2005, the center has received about 400 housing discrimination complaints, mostly alleging discrimination because of a person’s disability or source of income. Nationwide, 2008 saw nearly 31,000 housing discrimination complaints, a 3,735-complaint increase from 2007.

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